News, Media & Blogs

Latest News

Our Blogs

  • Improving Learning Inside Folsom Prison

    by LearnEd

    Photo of an entrance

    Learning for All

    "Everyone is entitled to an education," says Pearson's Erin Smith. "Some of us just come to different opportunities at different stages in life."

    Erin has spearheaded a project along with colleagues LeeAnne Fisher and Kathryn Bass to put several dozen Pearson classroom e-books in the hands of about 300 inmates at California's Folsom Prison. She's working with tech company Innertainment Delivery Systems (IDS) to deliver these books digitally on secure, controlled tablets.

    The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) uses these eReaders for inmates working towards credits in college courses across the state's prison system through something called the Voluntary Education Program, or VEP. The CDCR reports:

    "At a recent focus group with the first cohort of inmates to use the eReaders for college courses, many of them agreed that the eReader has not only encouraged them to continue to take courses but it has also piqued the interest of other inmates who are unable to afford college textbooks."

    Using a Tablet for the First Time

    "A few years ago, the U.S. Department of Education outlined a recommended plan for the rehabilitation of inmates prior to their release," Erin Smith says. The plan suggested using "advanced technologies."

    Folsom Books

    "Technology is a lot cheaper for cash-strapped state prison systems," Erin says. "It also helps these inmates with tech skills that could smooth their re-entry process once they leave prison."

    "Some of these inmates are using a tablet for the first time," she says.

    Classes While Incarcerated

    Pearson book titles are being used inside Folsom starting this month.

    tablet

    "It's a project we could easily replicate to prison systems across the country," Erin says. "It's something Pearson should be doing because it's a reminder that learning can flourish in the most unsuspecting places."

    The CDCR says "in the case of current inmates attending college classes while incarcerated, it dramatically reduces the likelihood he/she will reoffend once back in society."

    'What Else Can We Do?'

    "So many people just didn't get the opportunities I had," Erin says. "My mom drove me to school, dad drove me to basketball practice—it was understood that I was going to college."

    "This Folsom project is a good reason to come to work today," Erin says. "Since we've done this, it makes me wonder: What else can we do?"

    read more
  • The Good Part of Learning Struggle

    by LearnEd

    A tired student

    brad opener-01

    "When a student struggles with learning, it's not always a crisis," says Brad Ermeling, a doctor of education at Pearson's Center for Educator Learning and Effectiveness. "In fact, a large body of research in psychology and math education shows that some forms of struggle are actually productive for student learning."

    can help-01

    This kind of thinking, in some ways, goes against the grain of how our education system has evolved.

    "Students who are always looking for the quick answer are not prepared to persist and struggle with difficult problems," Brad says. "Learners need to be pushed to think critically, struggle through tough questions, and apply what they've learned."

    Brad and a team of scientists are currently working with UCLA researchers to understand the causes and benefits of productive struggle. They want to help teachers and parents be more aware of how these concepts can improve student outcomes.

    Tips to Help Learners Who Are Struggling

    "Watching students struggle is uncomfortable," Brad says. "It's a hard concept to fully embrace and, sometimes, it's tough to tell the difference between productive struggle and unproductive struggle."

    When a child is laboring over a homework assignment, Brad suggests this approach for parents:

    "Try asking general questions like 'Can you tell me what the question is asking?' If they can articulate the question, then let them work through the problem. If they're grasping what the question is asking, then they're on the right track to figuring out the answer."

    struggle tips

    In this video, Brad shares some additional tips for parents helping their little learners with math:

    read more
  • Future Graduate Update: One Girl's Tribute to Her Teachers

    by LearnEd

    Speech bubble illustration

    Pearson and America’s Promise are working together to help communities raise graduation rates for students like this young woman who often fall through the cracks.

     

    Essence Blakemore is working hard to be a leader in her community.

    As such, she's busy: Essence is an active member of Minnesota Alliance with Youth, she is involved with the Minnesota Youth Council's Education Committee, she assisted the Minnesota Department of Education secure grant money for after-school programs, and she helped write a bill to make the Minnesota Youth Council an official liaison to the governor's office and legislature.

    Essence also plays the guitar, draws with pastels, knits, crochets, and writes poetry and short stories.

    In this video, Essence’s covers one of the five America’s Promise Alliance promises, which is an ongoing relationship with a “Caring Adult”—a parent, mentor, tutor or coaches who helps keep a young person motivated.

    The GradNation State Activation initiative is a collaboration between America’s Promise Alliance and Pearson working to increase high school graduation rates to 90 percent. It's programs like the ones Essence supports that help keep students motivated to stay in school.

    Today, Civic Enterprises and Everyone Graduates Center at Johns Hopkins University School of Education in partnership with the Alliance for Excellent Education and America’s Promise Alliance will host a webinar discussing the latest data findings on graduation rates in the U.S. To register, please click here. To learn more about the GradNation State Activation program, please click here

    Essence Blakemore on Caring Adults from Pearson Learning News on Vimeo.

    read more
  • Graduate Update: The Teacher That Almost Wasn't

    by LearnEd

    Speech bubble illustration

    Josh Graphic-01

    Pearson and America’s Promise are working together to help communities raise graduation rates for students like this young man who often fall through the cracks.

     

    Josh Wood grew up in Northfield, Minnesota in a difficult home. He became disengaged from school—and he stopped going altogether while in the 8th grade.

    It was during that year that his school’s truancy officer invited him to join Summer Plus, a school program with kids in similar circumstances. Josh quickly became interested in school again and, starting in the 9th grade, he was paired with an AmeriCorps Promise Fellow who helped him with academics and study skills.

    Josh says this early intervention helped him graduate high school with a total of 24 college credits. He says it helped him go on to graduate from Hamline University. And he says, without it all, he probably wouldn't be a 4th grade teacher today.

    The GradNation State Activation initiative is a collaboration between America’s Promise Alliance and Pearson working to increase high school graduation rates to 90 percent. It's programs like AmeriCorps Promise Fellows, a team of individuals that ensure youth success, that keep students like Josh motivated to stay in school.

    Hear Josh's story in his own words:

    Today, Civic Enterprises and Everyone Graduates Center at Johns Hopkins University School of Education in partnership with the Alliance for Excellent Education and America’s Promise Alliance will host a webinar discussing the latest data findings on graduation rates in the U.S. To register, please click here. To learn more about the GradNation State Activation program, please click here.


    Josh Wood's Improbable Return to School
    from Pearson Learning News on Vimeo.

    read more
Sorry, there are no blog posts to display.
Sorry, there are no blog posts to display.
Sorry, there are no blog posts to display.

Useful links

Contact Us