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Pi Day Learning: Collages, Play Dough, and Number Books

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From our Project Literacy partners at the Parent-Child Home Program, 3 number games to play with your kids for Pi Day, Monday—3/14:


Shape CollageMaking collages is a great way to support early math development.

Cutting out paper shapes with your child provides opportunities to count the number of sides on each shape.
It helps them become more familiar with number names and early-stage counting.

collages

You can help your child think about how the pieces fit together, similar to the way you might approach puzzles—or ask them how various shapes are similar and different.

Cutting out shapes, manipulating small pieces, and gluing will also help support your child’s fine motor skills.


play dough

Who doesn't love play dough? Plus—making it—opens a door to sensory play and learning.

You and your child can practice math skills by counting the steps in the recipe, measuring ingredients, and discussing the concept of part(s) versus whole.  Challenge your child to make familiar shapes with the play dough and compare sizes, introducing the concept of big versus small.

big small

Creating and manipulating the dough will strengthen your child’s fingers and enhance fine motor development, essential to school readiness.


number book

Helping your child create a 0-10 booklet is a fun and engaging way to develop early numeracy skills.

Each page of the booklet features a number, with a corresponding amount of items glued to the page.  Once your child becomes familiar with larger numbers, you can add on!

As you glue and fill out each page, invite your child to count items and practice recognizing the names of each number in a way that helps them become familiar with numbers.

familiar

The Parent-Child Home Program’s (PCHP) nationwide network of program sites provides low-income families with the necessary skills and tools to ensure their children achieve their greatest potential in school and in life. Together we are strengthening families and communities, and preparing the workforce of the future.