Reinforced Concrete: Mechanics and Design, 8th edition

  • James K. Wight

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Overview

Reinforced Concrete uses the theory of reinforced concrete design to teach the basic scientific and artistic principles of civil engineering. Examples and practice problems help you develop your engineering judgment and apply complicated engineering concepts to real-world scenarios.

Published by Pearson (July 6th 2021) - Copyright © 2022

ISBN-13: 9780136834243

Subject: Civil Engineering

Category: Concrete

Table of contents

Table of Contents

  1. INTRODUCTION
    • 1-1 Reinforced Concrete Structures
    • 1-2 Mechanics of Reinforced Concrete
    • 1-3 Reinforced Concrete Members
    • 1-4 Factors Affecting Choice of Reinforced Concrete for a Structure
    • 1-5 Historical Development of Concrete and Reinforced Concrete as Structural Materials
    • 1-6 Building Codes and the ACI Code
    • References
  2. THE DESIGN PROCESS
    • 2-1 Objectives of Design
    • 2-2 The Design Process
    • 2-3 Limit States and the Design of Reinforced Concrete
    • 2-4 Structural Safety
    • 2-5 Probabilistic Calculation of Safety Factors
    • 2-6 Design Procedures Specified in the ACI Building Code
    • 2-7 Load Factors and Load Combinations in the 2019 ACI Code
    • 2-8 Loadings and Actions
    • 2-9 Design for Economy
    • 2-10 Sustainability
    • 2-11 Customary Dimensions and Construction Tolerances
    • 2-12 Inspection
    • 2-13 Accuracy of Calculations
    • 2-14 Handbooks and Design Aids
    • References
  3. MATERIALS
    • 3-1 Concrete
    • 3-2 Behavior of Concrete Failing in Compression
    • 3-3 Compressive Strength of Concrete
    • 3-4 Strength Under Tensile and Multiaxial Loads
    • 3-5 Stress-Strain Curves for Concrete
    • 3-6 Time-Dependent Volume Changes
    • 3-7 High-Strength Concrete
    • 3-8 Lightweight Concrete
    • 3-9 Fiber Reinforced Concrete
    • 3-10 Durability of Concrete
    • 3-11 Behavior of Concrete Exposed to High and Low Temperatures
    • 3-12 Shotcrete
    • 3-13 Reinforcement
    • 3-15 Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (FRP) Reinforcement
    • 3-16 Prestressing Steel
    • References
  4. FLEXURE: BEHAVIOR AND NOMINAL STRENGTH OF BEAM SECTIONS
    • 4-1 Introduction
    • 4-2 Flexure Theory
    • 4-3 Simplifications in Flexure Theory for Design
    • 4-4 Analysis of Nominal Moment Strength for Singly Reinforced Beam Sections
    • 4-5 Definition of Balanced Conditions
    • 4-6 Code Definitions of Tension-Controlled and Compression-Controlled Sections
    • 4-7 Beams With Compression Reinforcement
    • 4-8 Analysis of Flanged Sections
    • References
  5. FLEXURAL DESIGN OF BEAM SECTIONS
    • 5-1 Introduction
    • 5-2 Analysis of Continuous One-Way Floor Systems
    • 5-3 Design of Singly Reinforced Beam Sections with Rectangular Compression Zones
    • 5-4 Design of Doubly Reinforced Beam Sections
    • 5-5 Design of Continuous One-Way Slabs
    • References
  6. SHEAR IN BEAMS
    • 6-1 Introduction
    • 6-2 Basic Theory
    • 6-3 Behavior of Beams Failing in Shear
    • 6-4 Analysis and Design of Reinforced Concrete Beams for Shear—ACI Code
    • 6-5 Other Shear Design Methods
    • 6-6 Hanger Reinforcement
    • 6-7 Shear in Axially Loaded Members
    • References
  7. TORSION
    • 7-1 Introduction and Basic Theory
    • 7-2 Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Members Subjected to Torsion
    • 7-3 Thin-Walled Tube Analogies
    • 7-4 Design for Torsion and Shear—ACI Code Approach
    • 7-5 ACI Code Design Method for Torsion
    • References
  8. DEVELOPMENT, ANCHORAGE, AND SPLICING OF REINFORCEMENT
    • 8-1 Introduction
    • 8-2 Mechanism of Bond Transfer
    • 8-3 Development Length
    • 8-4 Hooked Anchorages
    • 8-5 Headed Bars in Tension
    • 8-6 Design for Anchorage
    • 8-7 Bar Cutoffs and Development of Bars in Flexural Members
    • 8-8 Reinforcement Continuity and Structural Integrity Requirements
    • 8-9 Splices
    • References
  9. SERVICEABILITY
    • 9-1 Introduction
    • 9-2 Elastic Analysis of Stresses in Beam Sections
    • 9-3 Cracking
    • 9-4 Deflections of Concrete Beams
    • 9-5 Consideration of Deflections in Design
    • 9-6 Frame Deflections
    • 9-7 Vibrations
    • 9-8 Fatigue
    • References
  10. CONTINUOUS BEAMS AND ONE-WAY SLABS
    • 10-1 Introduction
    • 10-2 Continuity in Reinforced Concrete Structures
    • 10-3 Continuous Beams
    • 10-4 Design of Girders
    • 10-5 Joist Floors
    • References
  11. COLUMNS: COMBINED AXIAL LOAD AND BENDING
    • 11-1 Introduction
    • 11-2 Tied and Spiral Columns
    • 11-3 Interaction Diagrams
    • 11-4 Interaction Diagrams for Reinforced Concrete Columns
    • 11-5 Design of Short Columns
    • 11-6 Contributions of Steel and Concrete to Column Strength
    • 11-7 Biaxially Loaded Columns
    • References
  12. SLENDER COLUMNS
    • 12-1 Introduction
    • 12-2 Behavior and Analysis of Pin-Ended Columns
    • 12-3 Design of Columns in Nonsway Frames
    • 12-4 Behavior of Restrained Columns in Sway Frames
    • 12-5 Calculation of Moments in Sway Frames Using Second-Order Analysis
    • 12-6 Design of Columns in Sway Frames
    • 12-7 General Analysis of Slenderness Effects
    • 12-8 Torsional Critical Load
    • References
  13. TWO-WAY SLABS: BEHAVIOR, ANALYSIS, AND DESIGN
    • 13-1 Introduction
    • 13-2 History of Two-Way Slabs
    • 13-3 Behavior of Slabs Loaded to Failure in Flexure
    • 13-4 Analysis of Moments in Two-Way Slabs
    • 13-5 Distribution of Moments in Slabs
    • 13-6 Design of Slabs
    • 13-7 The Direct-Design Method
    • 13-8 Equivalent-Frame Analysis Methods
    • 13-9 Shear Strength of Two-Way Slabs
    • 13-10 Combined Shear and Moment Transfer in Two-Way Slabs
    • 13-11 Details and Reinforcement Requirements
    • 13-12 Design of Slabs Without Beams
    • 13-13 Construction Loads on Slabs
    • 13-14 Deflections in Two-Way Slab Systems
    • 13-15 Use of Post-Tensioning
    • References
  14. TWO-WAY SLABS: ELASTIC AND YIELD-LINE ANALYSES
    • 14-1 Review of Elastic Analysis of Slabs
    • 14-2 Design Moments from a Finite-Element Analysis
    • 14-3 Yield-Line Analysis of Slabs: Introduction
    • 14-4 Yield-Line Analysis: Applications for Two-Way Slab Panels
    • 14-5 Yield-Line Patterns at Discontinuous Corners
    • 14-6 Yield-Line Patterns at Columns or at Concentrated Loads
    • References
  15. FOOTINGS
    • 15-1 Introduction
    • 15-2 Soil Pressure Under Footings
    • 15-3 Structural Action of Strip and Spread Footings
    • 15-4 Strip or Wall Footings
    • 15-5 Spread Footings
    • 15-6 Combined Footings
    • 15-7 Mat Foundations
    • 15-8 Pile Caps
    • References
  16. SHEAR FRICTION, HORIZONTAL SHEAR TRANSFER, AND COMPOSITE CONCRETE BEAMS
    • 16-1 Introduction
    • 16-2 Shear Friction
    • 16-3 Composite Concrete Beams
    • References
  17. DISCONTINUITY REGIONS AND STRUT-AND-TIE MODELS
    • 17-1 Introduction
    • 17-2 Struts
    • 17-3 Ties
    • 17-4 Nodes and Nodal Zones
    • 17-5 Other Strut-and-Tie Elements
    • 17-6 Layout of Strut-and-Tie Models
    • 17-7 Deep Beams
    • 17-8 Brackets and Corbels
    • 17-9 Dapped Ends
    • 17-10 Beam-Column Joints
    • 17-11 Bearing Strength
    • 17-12 T-Beam Flanges
    • References
  18. WALLS AND SHEAR WALLS
    • 18-1 Introduction
    • 18-2 Bearing Walls
    • 18-3 Retaining Walls
    • 18-4 Tilt-Up Walls
    • 18-5 Shear Walls
    • 18-6 Lateral Load-Resisting Systems for Buildings
    • 18-7 Shear-Wall-Frame Interaction
    • 18-8 Coupled Shear Walls
    • 18-9 Design of Structural Walls-General
    • 18-10 Flexural Strength of Shear Walls
    • 18-11 Shear Strength of Shear Walls
    • 18-12 Critical Loads for Axially Loaded Walls
    • References
  19. DESIGN FOR EARTHQUAKE RESISTANCE
    • 19-1 Introduction
    • 19-2 Seismic Response Spectra
    • 19-3 Seismic Design Requirements
    • 19-4 Seismic Forces on Structures
    • 19-5 Ductility of Reinforced Concrete Members
    • 19-6 General ACI Code Provisions for Seismic Design
    • 19-7 Beams in Special Moment Frames
    • 19-8 Columns in Special Moment Frames
    • 19-9 Joints of Special Moment Frames
    • 19-10 Structural Diaphragms
    • 19-11 Structural Walls
    • 19-12 Frame Members Not Proportioned to Resist Forces Induced by Earthquake Motions
    • 19-13 Special Precast Structures
    • 19-14 Foundations
    • References

APPENDIX A: DESIGN AIDS

APPENDIX B: NOTATION

INDEX

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