Brief Guide to Writing from Readings, A, MLA Update Edition

Brief Guide to Writing from Readings, A, MLA Update Edition, 7th edition

  • Stephen Wilhoit

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Overview

A Brief Guide to Writing from Readings is a clear, process-oriented guide to academic writing. It covers the subtleties of rhetorical analysis and argumentation strategies as well as the technical aspects of writing with sources. You'll learn to first examine texts critically and then to respond in essay form.

Published by Pearson (July 14th 2021) - Copyright © 2016

ISBN-13: 9780137504565

Table of contents

1.Critical Reading

Definition and Purpose

Asking Questions about What You Read
Questions to Ask Before You Begin a Close Reading of a Text
Questions to Ask While You Read and Reread Material

Marking Texts
Highlighting Texts
Annotating Texts
Sample Annotated Reading: "Hard Choices," by Patrick Moore
Note Taking
Before Jotting Down Any Notes, Always Write Down the Source Text's Full Bibliographic Information
In Your Notes, Carefully Distinguish between Material You Quote and Material You Paraphrase
Carefully List Page Numbers
Pay Attention to the Punctuation in the Source Text
In Your Notes, Clearly Differentiate between the Author's Ideas and Your Own
Be Consistent with Your Note-Taking System
Additional Reading: "Getting Serious about Eradicating Binge Drinking," by Henry Wechsler
Summary Chart: Critical Reading: Asking Questions
Summary Chart: Critical Reading: Marking Texts
Summary Chart: Critical Reading: Note Taking 

2. Quotation

Definition and Purpose
Guidelines on When to Quote Material
Quote Passages When the Author Has Written Something in a Distinctive or Especially Insightful or Interesting Way
Quote Material That Lends Support to a Position You Are Trying to Make in Your Paper
Quote Authorities Who Disagree with a Position You Are Advocating or Who Offer Alternative Explanations or Contradictory Data
Guidelines on When Not to Quote Material
Do Not Quote Passages Merely to Fill Space
Do Not Quote Passages as a Substitute for Thinking
Do Not Quote Passages Because You Do Not Understand the Author's Ideas Well Enough to Paraphrase Them
Integrating Quotations into Your Writing
Two Basic Types of Quotations
Reading: "Generation Text," by Mark Bauerlein
The Block Quotation
The Integrated Quotation
Altering Quoted Material and Avoiding Misquotations
Leaving Words Out of a Quotation
Adding Words to a Quotation
Noting Emphasis Added to a Quotation
Summary Chart: Guidelines on Quotations
Summary Chart: Integrating Quotations into Your Writing
Quotation Revision Checklist 

3. Paraphrase

Definition and Purpose
Qualities of a Good Paraphrase
Thorough
Accurate
Fair
Objective
How to Paraphrase Material
Changing Words
Changing Sentence Structure
Combining Sentences
"Unpacking" Sentences
Combining Strategies: Paraphrasing Longer Passages in Source Texts
Blending Your Writing with Paraphrased Material
Documentation
Summary Chart: How to Paraphrase Material
Paraphrase Revision Checklist 

4. Summary

Definition and Purpose
Types of Summaries
Qualities of a Good Summary
Comprehensive
Brief
Accurate
Neutral
Independent
How to Summarize a Text
Read, Reread, and Annotate the Source Text
Summarize Each Section of the Source Text
Check the Section Summaries against the Source Text
How to Write an Abstract
How to Write an Informative Summary Essay
How to Write an Explanatory Summary Essay
Documentation
Reading: "From Animal House to Big Brother: Student Privacy and Campus Safety in an Age of Accountability," by Ron Chesbrough
Sample Abstract
Sample Informative Summary Essay
Sample Explanatory Summary Essay
Summary Chart: How to Summarize Texts
Summary Revision Checklist

5. Analysis

Definition and Purpose
Reading: "The Story of an Hour," by Kate Chopin
How to Analyze a Text
Read the Source Text Carefully
Identify or Choose Which Analytical Criteria to Employ
Apply the Analytical Criteria to the Text
Interpret the Text
Explain and Support Your Interpretation
Qualities of a Good Analysis Essay
Comprehensive
Clear
Consistent
Tied to the Source Text
Informative
How to Write an Analysis Essay
Opening Section
Body
Concluding Section
Revising Your Essay
Accuracy
Development
Clarity
Balance
Documentation
Sample Analysis Essay
Summary Chart: How to Analyze Texts
Summary Chart: How to Write an Analysis Essay
Analysis Essay Checklist 

6. Response Essays

Definition and Purpose
Qualities of a Good Response Essay
Honest
Informed
Clear
Well Supported
Writing the Response Essay
Carefully Read the Material
Compose Your Rough Draft
Write Your Conclusion
Revise Your Rough Draft
Sample Response Essay
A Response to "From Animal House to Big Brother: Student Privacy and Campus Safety in an Age of Accountability"
Summary Chart: How to Write a Response Essay
Response Essay Revision Checklist 

7. Critique

Definition and Purpose
The Film Review as Critique
Writing a Critique
Step 1 -- Carefully Read and Annotate the Source Text
Step 2 -- Analyze and Evaluate the Reading
Step 3 -- Write Your Thesis and Decide Which Aspects of the Reading Will Be the Focus of Your Essay
Step 4 -- Write Your Rough Draft
Step 5 -- Rewrite Your Critique
Reading: "The Doctrine of Academic Freedom," by Sandra Y. L. Korn
Reading: "Academic Freedom vs. Academic Justice," by Michael LaBossiere
Sample Critique
"An Unconvincing Argument Concerning Academic Freedom"
Summary Chart: How to Write a Critique
Critique Revision Checklist 

8. Rhetorical Analysis of Written Texts

Definition and Purpose
The Rhetorical Situation
Elements of the Rhetorical Situation
Rhetorical Strategies
Content
Structure
Style
Analyzing a Text's Rhetorical Strategies -- An Example
Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address
A Rhetorical Analysis of Lincoln's Speech
Writing a Rhetorical Analysis Essay
Step 1 -- Carefully Read the Assignment
Step 2 -- Establish the Source Text's Rhetorical Situation
Step 3 -- Determine the Author's Goal
Step 4 -- Identify and Evaluate the Text's Rhetorical Strategies
Step 5 -- Determine Your Thesis
Step 6 -- Write Your Rough Draft
Step 7 -- Revise Your Essay
Sample Rhetorical Analysis Essay
Rhetorical Analysis of Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address
Summary Chart: How to Write a Rhetorical Analysis Essay
Rhetorical Analysis of Written Texts Revision Checklist 

9: Rhetorical Analysis of Visual Texts

Definition and Purpose
Reading Visual Texts Critically
Questions Concerning the Visual Text Itself
Questions Concerning the Visual Text's Creator or Source
Questions Concerning the Visual Text's Purpose
Questions Concerning the Visual Text's Audience
Questions Concerning Your Response to the Visual Text
Reading a Visual Text -- An Example
Questions Concerning the Visual Text
Questions Concerning the Visual Text's Creator or Source
Questions Concerning the Visual Text's Purpose
Questions Concerning the Visual Text's Audience
Questions Concerning Your Response to the Visual Text
Writing a Rhetorical Analysis of a Visual Text
Step 1 -- Carefully Read the Assignment
Step 2 -- Analyze and Describe the Text
Step 3 -- Establish the Text's Rhetorical Situation
Step 4 -- Determine How the Text Attempts to Achieve Its Rhetorical Goals
Step 5 -- Determine Your Thesis
Step 6 -- Write a Rough Draft
Step 7 -- Revise Your Essay
Sample Rhetorical Analysis of a Visual Text
An Effective Advertisment for Literacy Support
Summary Chart: How to Write a Rhetorical Analysis of a Visual Text
Rhetorical Analysis of a Visual Text Revision Checklist 

10. Informative Synthesis

Definition and Purpose
Types of Synthesis Essays
Reading: "Humanity 2.? Enhancement, Evolution and the Possible Futures of Humanity," by Sarah Chan
Reading: "On Designer Babies: Genetic Enhancement of Human Embryos Is Not a Practice for Civil Societies," by Sheldon Krimsky
Reading: "A Moderate Approach to Enhancement," by Michael Selgelid
Informative Synthesis
Definition
Writing an Informative Synthesis
Sample Informative Synthesis
The Ethical Debate over Human Enhancement and Designer Babies
Summary Chart: How to Write an Informative Synthesis
Informative Synthesis Revision Checklist 

11. Argumentative Synthesis

Definition and Purpose
The Elements of Argument
Claims
Grounds
Warrants
Argument and Persuasion
Appeals Based on Reason
Appeals Based on Emotion
Appeals Based on Character and Credibility
Writing an Argumentative Synthesis
Step 1 -- Analyze the Assignment
Step 2 -- Annotate and Critique the Readings
Step 3 -- Formulate a Thesis
Step 4 -- Choose an Organizational Plan
Step 5 -- Write Your Rough Draft
Step 6 -- Revise Your Draft
Step 7 -- Check Quotations and Documentation
Sample Argumentative Synthesis
Make Human Enhancement Available to All
Additional Reading: "A New Definition of Leadership," by Josh Misner
Additional Reading: "Understanding Your Leadership Balance," by Lee Ellis
Additional Reading: "A Question of Leadership," by Gene Klann and Talula Cartwright
Summary Chart: How to Write an Argumentative Synthesis
Argumentative Synthesis Revision Checklist 

12. Plagiarism

Definition
Forms of Plagiarism
Purchasing a Paper
Turning in a Paper Someone Else Has Written for You
Turning in Another Student's Work without That Student's Knowledge
Improper Collaboration
Copying a Paper from a Source Text without Proper Acknowledgment
Cutting and Pasting Material from Sources
Lifting Images from the Web or Other Sources
Copying Statistics
Copying Material from a Source Text, Supplying Proper Documentation, but Leaving Out Quotation Marks
Paraphrasing Material from a Reading without Proper Documentation
Self-Plagiarism
Why Students Plagiarize Work
How to Avoid Plagiarism
Do Your Own Work
Take Good Notes
Paraphrase Properly
Supply Proper Documentation
Online Plagiarism Check
Clarify Collaboration Guidelines
Summary Chart: Plagiarism
Plagiarism Checklist 

13. Documentation

Definition and Purpose
Types of Documentation
Primary Academic Style Manuals
APA Guidelines
In-Text Documentation
Footnotes and Endnotes
MLA Guidelines
In-Text Documentation
Footnotes and Endnotes 

14. Reference Lists and Works Cited Entries

Definition and Purpose
APA Format
Sample Reference List Entries
Sample APA-Style Reference List
MLA Format
Sample Works Cited Entries
Sample MLA-Style Works Cited List

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