Texts and Contexts: Writing About Literature with Critical Theory

Texts and Contexts: Writing About Literature with Critical Theory, 7th edition

  • Steven Jay Lynn

Choose the option that's right for you

Single

$9.99 / mo

4-month minimum term for $39.96

  • Access this eText title
  • Up to 2 devices

Multi

$14.99 / mo

4-month minimum term for $59.96

  • Access over 1,500 titles
  • Up to 2 devices
  • Discounted tutor access

Learn more, spend less

  • Icon

    Listen on the go

    Learn how you like with full eText audio

  • Icon

    Learn anytime, anywhere

    Get the app to access your eText whenever you need it

  • Icon

    Make it your own

    Your notes. Your highlights. Your eText

  • Icon

    Find it fast

    Quickly navigate your eText with search

  • Icon

    Stay organized

    Access all your eTexts in one place

Overview

Texts and Contexts teaches you how to write about literature by considering how readers behave and what assumptions they might make while interacting with literary text. The authors cover literary theory as well as provide overviews of literature and examples of how to write about them.

Published by Pearson (July 14th 2021) - Copyright © 2017

ISBN-13: 9780137541096

Table of contents

BRIEF CONTENTS

1. An Introduction, Theoretically
2. Critical Words: A Selective Tour
3. Unifying the Work: New Criticism
4. Creating the Text: Reader-Response Criticism
5. Opening Up the Text: Structuralism and Deconstruction
6. Connecting the Text: Historical and New Historical Criticism
7. Minding the Work: Psychological Criticism
8. Gendering the Text: Feminist Criticism, Post-feminism, and Queer Theory

COMPREHENSIVE CONTENTS

1. An Introduction, Theoretically
Textual Tours
Checking Some Baggage
"Is There One Correct Interpretation of a Literary Work?"
"So, Are All Opinions About Literature Equally Valid?
Anything to Declare?
Theory Enables Practice
You Already Have a Theoretical Stance
This is an Introduction
Here's the Plan
Works Cited and Recommended Further Reading

2. Critical Worlds: A Selective Tour
Brendan Gill, from Here at "The New Yorker"

New Criticism
Reader-Response Criticism
Structuralist and Deconstructive Criticism
Historical, Postcolonial, and Cultural Studies
Psychological Criticism
Political Criticism
Other Approaches
Works Cited and Recommended Further Reading

3. Unifying the Work: New Criticism
The Purpose of New Criticism
Basic Principles Reflected
Archibald MacLeish, "Ars Poetica"
Radicals in Tweed Jackets
How to Do New Criticism
Film and Other Genres
The Writing Process: A Sample Essay
Gwendolyn Brooks, "The Mother"
Preparing to Write
Shaping
Drafting
Practicing New Criticism
Stephen Shu-ning Liu, "My Father's Martial Art"
Questions
Ben Jonson, "On My First Son"
Questions
The Parable of the Prodigal Son
Questions
Useful Terms for New Criticism
Checklist for New Criticism
Works Cited
Recommended Further Reading

4. Creating the Text: Reader-Response Criticism
The Purpose of Reader-Response Criticism
New Criticism as the Old Criticism
The Reader Emerges
Hypertextual Readers
How to Do Reader-Response Criticism
Preparing to Respond
Sandra Cisneros, "Love Poem #1"
Making Sense
Subjective Response
Receptive Response
The Writing Process: A Sample Essay
Preparing to Respond
Ernest Hemingway, A Very Short Story
Preparing to Write
Shaping
Drafting
Practicing Reader-Response Criticism
Michael Drayton, "Since There's No Help"
Questions
Judith Minty, Killing the Bear
Questions
Tom Wayman, "Did I Miss Anything?"
Questions
A. Williams "deep as space"
Questions
Useful Terms for Reader-Response Criticism
Checklist: Using Reader-Response Criticism
Works Cited
Recommended Further Reading

5. Opening Up the Text: Structuralism and Deconstruction
The Purposes of Structuralism and Deconstruction
Structuralism and Semiotics
Poststructuralism and Deconstruction
How to Do Structuralism and Deconstruction
William Butler Yeats, "Sailing to Byzantium"
The Writing Process: A Sample Essay
Amy Clampitt, "Discovery"
Preparing to Write
Shaping
Drafting
Practicing Structuralist and Deconstructive Criticism
Questions
Cut through the anxiety, the unknown, the hassle . . .
William Blake, "London"
Questions
Linda Pastan, "Ethics"
Questions
John Donne, "Death Be Not Proud"
Questions
Useful Terms for Deconstruction
Checklist for Deconstruction
Works Cited
Recommended Further Reading

6. Connecting the Text: Historical and New Historical Criticism
The Purposes of Historical and New Historical Criticism
Biographical and Historical Criticism
John Milton, "When I Consider How My Light Is Spent"
Cultural Studies
New Historicism
History as Text
Marxist Criticism
Postcolonial and Ethnic Studies
How to Do Biographical and Historical Criticism
The Writing Process: Sample Essays
John Cheever, Reunion
A Biographical Essay
Preparing to Write
Shaping
Drafting
A New Historical Essay
Preparing to Write
Shaping

Your questions answered

Introducing Pearson+. Reimagined learning, designed for you. Choose from one eText or over 1,500 eTexts and study tools, all in one place, for one low monthly subscription. A new way to buy books that fits your budget. Make the most of your study time with offline access, enhanced search, notes and flashcards — to get organized, get the work done quicker and get results. Plus, with the app, put textbooks in your pocket and learn wherever. It's time to upgrade the textbook and simplify learning, so you can have time to live too.

Pearson eText is an easy-to-use digital textbook available from Pearson+. Make it your own by adding notes and highlights. Download the Pearson+ mobile app to learn on the go, even offline. Listen on the go with our new audiobook feature, available for most titles.

When you choose a plan, you're signing up for a 4-month term. We will charge your payment method each month until your 4-month term has ended. After that, we'll automatically renew your subscription and charge you on a month-to-month basis unless you turn off auto-renewal in My account.

When you purchase a Pearson+ subscription, it will last a minimum of 4 months, and then automatically renew each month thereafter unless you turn off auto-renew in My account.

If you want to stop your subscription at the end of your 4-month term, simply turn off auto-renew from My account. To avoid the next payment charge, make sure you turn auto renewal off 1 day before the auto renewal date.

You can subscribe again after auto-renew has been turned off by purchasing another Pearson+ subscription.

We use your credit card to renew your subscription automatically. To make sure your learning is uninterrupted, please check your card details before your first monthly payment.

With a Multi Pearson+ subscription plan, you can download up to 5 titles on the Pearson+ app from My list on each of your authorized devices every month.

When you're using your Multi Pearson+ subscription plan in a browser, you can select and read from as many titles as you like.