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Solaris Internals: Solaris 10 and OpenSolaris Kernel Architecture (paperback), 2nd edition

  • Richard McDougall
  • Jim Mauro

Published by Pearson (July 10th 2006) - Copyright © 2007

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Solaris Internals: Solaris 10 and OpenSolaris Kernel Architecture

ISBN-13: 9780132799539

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Overview

"The Solaris™Internals volumes are simply the best and most comprehensive treatment of the Solaris (and OpenSolaris) Operating Environment. Any person using Solaris--in any capacity--would be remiss not to include these two new volumes in their personal library. With advanced observability tools in Solaris (likeDTrace), you will more often find yourself in what was previously unchartable territory. Solaris™ Internals, Second Edition, provides us a fantastic means to be able to quickly understand these systems and further explore the Solaris architecture--especially when coupled with OpenSolaris source availability."

--Jarod Jenson, chief systems architect, Aeysis

"The Solaris™ Internals volumes by Jim Mauro and Richard McDougall must be on your bookshelf if you are interested in in-depth knowledge of Solaris operating system internals and architecture. As a senior Unix engineer for many years, I found the first edition of Solaris™ Internals the only fully comprehensive source for kernel developers, systems programmers, and systems administrators. The new second edition, with the companion performance and debugging book, is an indispensable reference set, containing many useful and practical explanations of Solaris and its underlying subsystems, including tools and methods for observing and analyzing any system running Solaris 10 or OpenSolaris."

--Marc Strahl, senior UNIX engineer

Solaris™ Internals, Second Edition, describes the algorithms and data structures of all the major subsystems in the Solaris 10 and OpenSolaris kernels. The text has been extensively revised since the first edition, with more than 600 pages of new material. Integrated Solaris tools and utilities, including DTrace, MDB, kstat, and the process tools, are used throughout to illustrate how the reader can observe the Solaris kernel in action. The companion volume, Solaris™ Performance and Tools, extends the examples contained here, and expands the scope to performance and behavior analysis. Coverage includes:
  • Virtual and physical memory
  • Processes, threads, and scheduling
  • File system framework and UFS implementation
  • Networking: TCP/IP implementation
  • Resource management facilities and zones

The Solaris™ Internals volumes make a superb reference for anyone using Solaris 10 and OpenSolaris.



Table of contents

Foreword xxvii

Preface xxix

About the Authors xxxvii

Acknowledgments xxxix

Part One: Introduction to Solaris Internals 1

Chapter 1: Introduction 3

1.1 Key Features of Solaris 10, Solaris 9, and Solaris 8 4

1.2 Key Differentiators 12

1.3 Kernel Overview 15

1.4 Processes, Threads, and Scheduling 18

1.5 Interprocess Communication 23

1.6 Signals 25

1.7 Memory Management 26

1.8 Files and File Systems 29

1.9 Resource Management 30

Part Two: The Process Model 41

Chapter 2: The Solaris Process Model 43

2.1 Components of a Process 44

2.2 Process Model Evolution 48

2.3 Executable Objects 52

2.4 Process Structures 55

2.5 Kernel Process Table 79

2.6 Process Resource Attributes 84

2.7 Process Creation 89

2.8 System Calls 98

2.9 Process Termination 106

2.10 The Process File System 110

2.11 Signals 129

2.12 Sessions and Process Groups 150

2.13 MDB Reference 156

Chapter 3: Scheduling Classes and the Dispatcher 157

3.1 Fundamentals 157

3.2 Processor Abstractions 162

3.3 Dispatcher Queues, Structures, and Variables 171

3.4 Dispatcher Locks 183

3.5 Dispatcher Initialization 190

3.6 Scheduling Classes 192

3.7 Thread Priorities 207

3.8 Dispatcher Functions 234

3.9 Preemption 246

3.10 The Kernel Sleep/Wakeup Facility 253

3.11 Interrupts 262

3.12 Summary 270

3.13 MDB Reference 271

Chapter 4: Interprocess Communication 273

4.1 The System V IPC Framework 274

4.2 System V IPC Resource Controls 282

4.3 Configuring IPC Tuneables on Solaris 10 285

4.4 System V Shared Memory 286

4.5 System V Semaphores 295

4.6 System V Message Queues 299

4.7 POSIX IPC 303

4.8 Solaris Doors 312

4.9 MDB Reference 321

Chapter 5: Process Rights Management 323

5.1 Then and Now 323

5.2 Least Privilege in Solaris 324

5.3 Process Privilege Models 325

5.4 Privilege Awareness: The Details 334

5.5 Least Privilege Interfaces 344

Part Three: Resource Management 365

Chapter 6: Zones 367

6.1 Introduction 367

6.2 Zone Runtime 371

6.3 Booting Zones 375

6.4 Security 379

6.5 Process Model 386

6.6 File Systems 389

6.7 Networking 393

6.8 Devices 398

6.9 Interprocess Communication 405

6.10 Resource Management and Observability 407

6.11 MDB Reference 414

Chapter 7: Projects, Tasks, and Resource Controls 415

7.1 Projects and Tasks Framework 415

7.2 The Project Database 418

7.3 Project and Task APIs 419

7.4 Kernel Infrastructure for Projects and Tasks 420

7.5 Resource Controls 423

7.6 Interfaces for Resource Controls 432

7.7 Kernel Interfaces for Resource Controls 437

Part Four: Memory 445

Chapter 8: Introduction to Solaris Memory 447

8.1 Virtual Memory Primer 447

8.2 Two Levels of Memory 448

8.3 Memory Sharing and Protection 448

8.4 Pages: Basic Units of Physical Memory 448

8.5 Virtual-to-Physical Translation 449

8.6 Physical Memory Management: Paging and Swapping 450

8.7 Virtual Memory as a File System Cache 450

8.8 New Features of the Virtual Memory Implementation 451

Chapter 9: Virtual Memory 455

9.1 Design Overview 455

9.2 Virtual Address Spaces 457

9.3 Tracing the VM System 466

9.4 Virtual Address Space Management 467

9.5 Segment Drivers 476

9.6 Anonymous Memory 485

9.7 The Anonymous Memory Layer 487

9.8 The swapfs Layer 489

9.9 Virtual Memory Watchpoints 492

9.10 Changes to Support Large Pages 494

9.11 MDB Reference 501

Chapter 10: Physical Memory 503

10.1 Physical Memory Allocation 503

10.2 Pa

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