A year of online learning: what's working, what’s not

Presenter(s): Ken Beatty

Over the past year, both teachers and students have been thrust into online learning. There have been countless challenges, including access to technology, adequate training, and the need to tailor presentation strategies, learning materials, and assessments. Much of this has resulted in technology stress for both teachers and students. At the same time, there have been many aspects of online learning that teachers and students have grown to enjoy: recordings of lectures can be replayed again and again at convenient times, travel time to class have been reduced to zero, teachers and students may feel more accessible online and, in the face of plagiarism and cheating concerns, assessment has become more creative and personalized. These and other issues help to point the directions teachers are likely to follow in the coming years, including blended learning and hybrid learning.

Photo of Ken Beatty

Over the past year, both teachers and students have been thrust into online learning. There have been countless challenges, including access to technology, adequate training, and the need to tailor presentation strategies, learning materials, and assessments. Much of this has resulted in technology stress for both teachers and students. At the same time, there have been many aspects of online learning that teachers and students have grown to enjoy: recordings of lectures can be replayed again and again at convenient times, travel time to class have been reduced to zero, teachers and students may feel more accessible online and, in the face of plagiarism and cheating concerns, assessment has become more creative and personalized. These and other issues help to point the directions teachers are likely to follow in the coming years, including blended learning and hybrid learning.

Recorded: