• Take a Step Back to Manage Your Stress

    by Kayshla Jimenez

    A patch of bright purple flowers from the blog author’s garden.

    As the semester ends it means finals are slowly approaching, and there's something everyone shares from this: stress, anxiety, and the feeling of being overwhelmed. Everyone should be learning to de-stress from the finals, take a step back and breathe. It's important to remember that it's completely natural to feel stress and anxiety in ourselves but those shouldn’t stop us from obtaining peace. It can all start with taking breaks from social media, taking care of your body, taking some time to unwind and relax, and connecting with friends and family.

    Like you, I also become overwhelmed with stress when finals approach; it leaves me restless and unable to properly focus. I've realized now though that taking some time to destress isn’t a bad thing. Here are three techniques I do when I'm filled with anxiety.

    Meditate

    First and most importantly, maintaining a clear and calm mindset can get you up and going and could help you finish strong. It could start with you in your room. Set up your space to be clean and peaceful. Ordering your surroundings can help order your mind. Adding plants to your space can help decrease stress and promote a more meditative environment. Meditation is a common practice along with yoga and prayer that can help your mind and body.

    Get Moving

    Another approach you can attempt is exercise, staying fit and being active can let you destress, it can also apply to taking a walk, jog or quick run. Eating well and getting enough sleep helps maintain the best health. A healthy body promotes a healthy mind too.

    Unplug

    Unplugging from social media could be one of the best escapes to destress, even if it's for a short period of time. You can listen to music or spend time on one of your hobbies. Try something new. One thing about social media is the novelty it brings. Our brain craves that. If we give it novelty outside of social media, we can still satisfy that while experiencing new things.

    These are just suggestions; you can change it to fit your liking. But remember – stress only happens when you feel you must figure everything out at once. Just take a deep breath and move forward. For more tips on how to handle anxiety and stress, visit this blog.

    Do you have a compelling story or student success tips you’d like to see published on the Pearson Students blog?  If you are a college student and interested in writing for us – click here to pitch your idea and get started! 

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  • Stress: What It Is and How to Handle It

    by Andrew Bierbower

    A young female college student sits at a desk in her room working on a laptop computer. There is also a desktop monitor and tablet open on her desk. There are various posters on the wall in front of her, including one for Harry Styles.

    Stress is not inherently a bad thing. Stress can be a good motivator and can help you be productive. No one lives a completely stress-free life. The important thing to recognize is when your stress begins to take over everyday tasks and becomes counter-productive. If your stress begins to impinge on your ability to complete daily tasks or if it becomes debilitating, it’s well past the point of you having to talk to someone. Here are four things students can do to manage stress.

    Evaluate The Semester

    First, understand that semesters are variable and can range from overwhelming to easy. It is not forever, even though it may seem that way, and you will get through it. Lowering your expectations for school and concentrating more on improving your life balance to improve your stress will work wonders for your mental well-being.

    If you are working while also enrolled in school, try to see if you can reduce your work hours for your busiest school weeks or around big projects. Go over your semester with your boss and see if you can work around difficult weeks. Perhaps you can drop a shift here or there or take a few fewer hours and make up for it later. Trying to balance too many things at once is one of the leading causes of stress and the simplest solution is almost always the best: do less!

    Have a Game Plan

    Maximizing your available time is another key tip in reducing the stress you feel when your plate is full. Getting a scheduler and planning out your week, hour by hour or day by day can help you feel more in control of your life. You can see what you must complete and can more easily schedule more downtime. That could mean you take a half-hour/hour each day to go for a walk or run, read, hang out with friends, go to the gym, watch tv, or just zone out. Make sure you are actively scheduling your time!

    Use Your Resources

    One of the hardest things to do when you are feeling overwhelmed is to reach out for help. This means going to your professor's office hours when you don't understand a concept in class. This means heading over to your wellness center and talking to a counselor about your stress. This means participating in campus activities or club events. This means seeking out workshops dedicated to making you a better student. Utilize the resources on your campus that are there to make your life easier!

    Study for Mastery

    Lastly, studying more efficiently can reduce the amount of time it feels like you’re spending on tasks. Don't spend 4 hours studying what could be learned in 20 min. One of the worst ways that you can study is simply by re-reading the material. Instead, try writing out your notes again or writing them in a different format; even better yet, explain your notes to a friend! Mastery of a subject comes when you can explain it to someone else. For math or science-heavy subjects, the only way to study is by practicing questions repeatedly, so get extra questions from your professor or online.

    Putting these tips into practice can be much harder than just reading about them. It is important to take small, incremental steps and make sure you aren’t overwhelming yourself all at once.

    Do you have a compelling story or student success tips you’d like to see published on the Pearson Students blog?  If you are a college student and interested in writing for us – click here to pitch your idea and get started! 

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  • More Plants, Less Stress

    by Lauren Kot

    A collection of six houseplants if a variety of planters, including one in a pink ceramic cat.

    It is easy for college students to feel overwhelmed while juggling classes, study sessions, a job, and a social life, not to mention preparing for a future after college. But it can also be an incredibly exciting and wonderful time! Prioritizing mental health is so important for college students. Finding ways to help manage stress and relieve anxiety will have such a healthy impact on your overall health and wellness, and it will make your college experience all the better.

    One easy way that you can improve your mental health and wellbeing is caring for a houseplant. There are many ways that plants can better your overall health and wellbeing. Owning a plant has been shown to:

    • lower stress and anxiety
    • improve mood
    • give you a greater sense of purpose and responsibility
    • improve productivity
    • increase attention span
    • and improve air quality!

    Reduce Stress Levels

    How can one plant do all of this? Well to start, having plants around you makes you feel more relaxed, comfortable, and can reduce your physiological and psychological stress. Researchers found that students in a computer lab who were surrounded by plants had lower blood pressure than those who had no plants. Plants can make you feel less stressed, happier, and more optimistic. Watching a plant grow and admiring its beauty will instantly improve your mood.

    Increase Brain Function

    Studies have also shown that plants improve productivity and increase attention span, two things that all college students want in their life! Houseplants engage your senses, decreasing cortisol levels and increasing productivity. In one specific study, brain scans of students in a classroom showed that students who studied with real plants in the classroom were more attentive and concentrated better than those who did not have plants around them. Having a plant in your room allows for studying better and longer.

    Become a Plant Parent

    If you’re new to plant ownership, look for plants that need little maintenance, such as aloe vera, spider or snake plants, and succulents. Caring for a plant will give you a sense of responsibility and will improve your overall confidence. It strengthens your bond with nature and gives you a stronger sense of purpose.

    It may be intimidating at first to be in charge of keeping a plant alive, but it is way easier than you might have thought. Once your plant starts growing and flourishing it will encourage you to continue the pattern of caring and helping it grow. And the wonderful thing is that the plant gives back by improving your air quality. It does so by removing carbon dioxide from the air and replacing it with oxygen. Having a plant allows you to gain a greater sense of purpose as well as cleaner air to breathe.

    There are many things you can do to benefit your mental health, and owning a plant is just one of them. Even if you live in a small dorm or apartment, all you need is a little bit of sunlight and a small plant that doesn’t take up a lot of space. It is that simple! You can visit a local nursery or any home improvement store and find a plant for less than $10. You are one small action away from becoming a plant parent and a happier college student. Stress less and own a plant!

    Do you have a compelling story or student success tips you’d like to see published on the Pearson Students blog?  If you are a college student and interested in writing for us – click here to pitch your idea and get started! 

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  • Ten Tips to Manage Stress and Anxiety

    by Natalie Farran

    A white blanket is spread out on a rocky beach. A book with the words ‘My Bullet Journal’ is on the blanket.

    As the Spring semester gets into full swing, stress and anxiety can begin to creep into every college student’s day-to-day life. Here are ten simple ways to help you shift your mindset, feel relaxed & have better outcomes.

    1. Spend a quick minute saying gratitude statements for all you currently have. 
    2. Keep a journal to help you process anxious feelings. It doesn’t have to be lengthy; even setting aside 3-5 minutes to write each day can be beneficial.
    3. Try meditation and mindful breathing to help rejuvenate and refresh your outlook. There are many free apps that can help guide you through this process. If you have very little space in your day, try doing it when you first wake up or as the last thing you do before you go to bed. 
    4. Reframe how you talk to yourself. Your words have energy so telling yourself, “I can’t do it” will negatively affect your motivation and performance. Say instead, “I can do it, I am here to try...” to help bring about a positive change to your attitude.
    5. Big exams can bring about big stress levels. Along with studying ahead of time, be prepared to combat text anxiety on exam day. Get plenty of rest and have some relaxation exercises at the ready, such as deep breathing.
    6. Take a hot shower to help you to feel relaxed.
    7. Reward yourself when you accomplish short goals. Treat yourself with a favorite snack after a study session or build in time to socialize with friends after finishing a big assignment.
    8. Reach out to friends or mentors. Staying connected to others either through a virtual chat or getting together in person can boost your mood and renew your motivation.
    9. Remember that tomorrow is a new day. Don’t waste your energy worrying about what you did not do. Look ahead and vow to try your best going forward.
    10. Be thankful that each day is a new opportunity.

    Finally, keep in mind that college students face daily stressors and academic demands that can potentially aggravate mental health issues. Don’t be afraid to seek a therapist to talk with and help you find useful tools to use when you are not in your comfort zone. Contact your campus health services to find out what resources are offered.

    Do you have a compelling story or student success tips you’d like to see published on the Pearson Students blog?  If you are a college student and interested in writing for us – click here to pitch your idea and get started! 

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  • Hair Stylist or Hair Therapist? Finding Stress Relief at a Hair Salon

    by Kiara Smith

    Blog author Kiara Smith shows off five different hair styles from her salon visits.

    Having a bad day or feeling stressed? Why not take a trip to the hair salon? A new hair style could be just the “pick me up” you need. College students can always use a way to unwind from the stress of their classes and exams. Popular options are working out, meditating, socializing with friends, or treating yourself at a local coffee shop. Who needs an iced coffee when you could just get a new hairdo?!

    A 2-for-1 deal

    Hair stylists should be celebrated for their great works. They often double as both a beautician and a therapist – it’s a 2-for-1 deal! They not only cater to the needs of your hair but also to your soul. In fact, getting your hair done can be very therapeutic. On those days when it feels like whatever could go wrong, does go wrong, a visit to the hair salon can leave you feeling renewed.

    A listening ear

    When you close your eyes and lay your head back to get washed, it is like all your problems have vanished. You take a deep inhale, exhale, and release the weight of the world that was on your shoulders when you walked through the door. The appointment progresses, you engage in conversation, your stylist works their magic, In the process, they are the listening ear you have been needing. Then there is a big reveal. You leave not only less stressed, but also as a happy customer with a newfound confidence.

    With so much going on today, college students need to find ways to destress and rejuvenate themselves. As you can see, visiting a hair salon is one of my favorite ways to unwind. Take some well-deserved time for yourself and schedule a hair appointment to relax and refresh.

    Do you have a compelling story or student success tips you’d like to see published on the Pearson Students blog?  If you are a college student and interested in writing for us - click here to pitch your idea and get started!   

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  • College Students Can Try Yoga to Relieve Stress and Anxiety

    by Aathira Balu

    A woman sitting at the top of stairs, back to the camera, legs crossed and arms overhead in a yoga pose.

    Stress and anxiety are something everyone has to deal with at some point, whether it be social matters, academics, change, or just everyday life. Stress tends to run especially high with students balancing class, work, clubs, friends, family, and more. Finding a way to cope and minimize stress is imperative for a healthy life. I have found the best way for me to cope is through the practice of yoga.

    Why Start Yoga?

    Yoga is a practice of both the physical and mental minds and is a great way to integrate a healthful approach to your day-to-day routines. Yoga not only has great health benefits, but can also help reduce stress and anxiety. The practice of yoga can even help reduce the risk of chronic health conditions such as high blood pressure and heart disease. It also helps with increasing one’s flexibility, strength, and breathing capacity. Even though yoga is considered very safe, if you have any ongoing health conditions (such as arthritis, balancing issues, etc.), make sure to consult a doctor before beginning.

    Here are some things to keep in mind when getting started!

    On-line vs. In-Person

    There are many different types of yoga courses and classes that you can attend either online or in person and both have their benefits. For example, online practices can be low cost or free, plus they can be available on-demand for whatever fits into your schedule. In-person classes offer more personalized interaction with the teacher and may lead you through a more structured work out.

    Whether you select online, in-person, or a combination of both types of classes, plan out your week and find times that you know will be best for you to take a break and relax with some yoga. As a beginner, try and aim for 30-45 minutes as a full practice. As you get more advanced, 30 minutes can eventually become 90 minutes.

    Equipment

    Along with creating your own practice schedule, there are certain equipment/materials that people use when practicing, including things like yoga mats, blocks, straps, yoga wheels, etc. If you are a beginner, you can use what you have around your house such as the carpet instead of a mat, pillows to substitute as blocks, and a belt or long strap of some kind to serve as a yoga strap.

    When creating your own yoga workout, practice moves and positions that are most comfortable for you. Explore more simple starting poses to help you become more comfortable with the positioning, like child’s pose, bridge pose, plank pose, tree pose, etc. Modify them depending on your comfort, skill level, and/or any health conditions you may have.

    Benefits of Yoga

    The world of yoga is an amazing one that includes meditation, vibration, and devotion and is something that everyone should try out. Just as with learning any new skill, beginning a yoga practice requires a lot of patience. Start slow and be willing to learn and try new things; it takes time to become comfortable with this way of life. Good luck on all of your yoga journeys and always remember to stay calm and work hard.  

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  • Transitioning to a Plant-Based Diet

    by Logan Collins

    A collection of a wide variety of colorful fruits and vegetables.

    When becoming independent and going off to college you are faced with a lot of choices, especially ones involving nutrition. Nutritional choices include things like calorie intake and the type of foods and nutrients you are putting into your body. These decisions can have a big impact on things like the amount of energy we have or our mood. Recently I made the decision to transition to a plant-based diet. Here’s my experience with changing my diet and effects it has had on my everyday life. 

    Uncovering the Benefits of a Plant-Based Diet

    Last semester, I took a class called Plant-Based Living. By the middle of the semester, the class had fully convinced me to transition my diet to plant based. The key motivator that made me want to make this change was how plant-based diets can help improve mental health disorders and stress.

    During my studies, I learned that the majority animal products contain arachidonic acid, which can cause general inflammation in the brain. There is a direct link to inflammation in the brain and chemical imbalances of neurotransmitters causing depression and anxiety.

    Plants and vegetables contain antioxidants and phytochemicals which can repair damage and decrease inflammation in brain cells, while also restoring balance to neurotransmitters. Phytochemicals are known as a natural antidepressant that increases levels of serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine in the brain. 

    Making the Change

    After all the research I had done I decided to change my diet to see if I noticed a difference. The transition to vegetarian hasn’t been very hard since there are a lot of plants you can get protein from to replace meat. For example, I have been eating more tofu, chickpeas, and seitan. Plus, the protein you get from plants is better for you than the protein made by animals. After just a month of eating a vegetarian diet I felt improvement in my energy level and my overall mood. 

    Examining the Results

    Going vegetarian has helped push me outside of my comfort zone in terms of cooking and meal prep. Using social apps like TikTok has been a great resource for me to find quick and easy vegetarian recipes to try. One of my new favorite dishes is “ratatouille.” This is made completely from vegetables like eggplant, peppers, tomato, and squash. If you’ve seen the movie by the same name, the reaction the food critic has when tasting the dish is spot-on!

    Overall, my plant-based diet has had an overwhelmingly positive impact on my physical and mental health. They aren’t wrong when they say “an apple a day keeps the doctor away” so make sure you’re eating plenty of fruits and vegetables! 

     

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  • How to de-stress without screens

    by Jasmine Hartman Budnik

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    When it comes to managing a busy schedule as a college student, we all know that it is essential to fit in time to de-stress. But if I’m being entirely honest, I often find myself sprawled out on my bed mindlessly scrolling through social media after a long day. Yet, it doesn’t feel very relieving to look at the time and realize that I just spent an entire hour glued to my phone watching random videos. In fact, I often end up feeling upset about being unproductive and even more overwhelmed by my to-do list. What I have learned is that screen-free methods of de-stressing actually leave me feeling more relaxed, motivated to get back to work, and content with what I accomplished at the end of the day.

    Relax on your own

    Finding a way to relax without technology is the perfect opportunity to treat yourself. If you take a break on your own, making something nice for yourself can be a great way to boost your mood. You can make your favorite drink – whether it be a classic cup of coffee or a tasty fruit smoothie – or put together a healthy meal or snack. Cooking and baking can be a great way to get yourself in a positive mindset so that you can tackle the rest of your responsibilities.

    Another creative way to unwind is to get your thoughts out by drawing or writing in a journal. If you feel like a “Dear Diary” entry is a little too cheesy for you, you can even try just writing out your highs and lows about your day on a sticky note. I often find that this can help me focus on positive moments and make changes to better tackle my schedule the following day.

    Spend time with friends

    If you are in the mood for a more social version of taking a technology-free break, spending time with others can be a great way to recharge your energy and positivity. On a nice day, my favorite thing to do is set out a blanket somewhere on campus and have a picnic with friends. And if you have something like a hammock, a frisbee, or a spike ball net, it can be a great addition to the fun. Don’t be afraid to mention to your friends that you are planning a screen-free get together. While it may be fun to take a picture to capture the moment, there’s nothing less social than when everyone is checking social media instead of hanging out together!

    Get active!

    One of the best things you can do to both relieve stress and feel good about yourself is to get outside and do something active. College campuses are especially great places to walk, run, or bike around. If you feel like a change in scenery, try looking for a nearby park where you can explore while being active.

    I have noticed that students easily forget all of the fun opportunities to be active that colleges often provide students for free. See what free classes your college gym might offer like Zumba, dance, or martial arts. Get moving and motivated by playing basketball or challenging your friend to a game of racquetball. I know that for me, being active can really help me de-stress and feel more accomplished by the end of the day.

    When it comes to unwinding without technology, the possibilities are truly endless. Whether you feel like spending time with other people, going outside, or treating yourself, all it takes is a little creativity to find a fulfilling and motivating way to reset. So next time you feel like taking a break, put your phone down, close your laptop, and discover how refreshing it is to be stress-free by going screen-free.

     
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  • Stress awareness: How college students can recognize and manage stress

    by Kamish Tajuddin

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    College is a time where one leaves home for the first time to pursue an education in their respective major. It is a time where one learns how to balance their schedules appropriately. College is a time where one cultivates and fosters new friendships and relationships that last a lifetime. These aspects are often highlighted and are expectations of many young adults when entering college for their first time. However, there are other aspects that can be overlooked. Often, students do not discuss how to appropriately deal with stress or social anxiety, both of which may be overbearing to even the biggest achievers. Many college students struggle daily to manage their mental health and stress. In fact, according to the American Psychological Association, 61 percent of college students nationally report dealing with anxiety and 45% struggle with stress related issues. In this blog, we will discuss ways to reduce stress and improve mental health.

    What is stress?

    There are three main types of stress that occur: Acute, Episodic Acute, and Chronic Acute stress. Acute stress is characterized as stress that comes unexpectedly because of an event, but it often goes away quickly. An example would be a test is coming up that you are not prepared for, or an argument you had recently with someone. Episodic acute stress is recurring stress that occurs in a pattern and is occupied by worry of what is happening to and around you. This can be because of a lack of a support system resulting from moving away from friends and family or from over-committing yourself to too many responsibilities and obligations. Lastly, chronic acute stress is where you experience stress that is never ending and slowly wears you out. This is considered one of the more dangerous types of stress, as it can even affect your physical health and potentially lead to depression.

    How do you handle it? 

    Although acute stress happens more frequently, it is also the easiest one to combat. Being able to implement strong time management skills is ideal, as it is proactive to this cause of stress. Other techniques would be implementing breathing techniques, good dieting habits, and cognitive reframing. A lot of on campus gyms offer stress release classes and are often free throughout the year, which can be helpful for dealing with this type of stress. As for episodic acute stress, one tactic to use in dealing with this type of stress is to physically write out every deadline and prioritize what needs to be done. Another method is to join a club or campus organization to make some friends and build a solid support group that you can lean on. Many schools offer organization fairs at the beginning of each semester to help connect students with campus clubs. Lastly, for cases of chronic acute stress it is best to reach out to a professional that is better equipped to help in this situation. Many campuses have their own separate department to deal with cases like these. Reach out, as those staff members are best equipped to help you.

    In conclusion, these are some of the types of stresses that college students can experience and how to go about dealing with them. Stress is inevitable; however one should be aware of the strategies and resources for how to deal with them in order to have a great semester! 

    Winerman, Lea. “By the Numbers: Stress on Campus.” Monitor on Psychology, American Psychological Association, Aug. 2017, www.apa.org/monitor/2017/09/numbers.

    Writers, Staff. “Student Stress & Anxiety Guide.” LearnPsychology.org, LearnPsychology.org, 1 July 2019, www.learnpsychology.org/student-stress-anxiety-guide/.

    “Types of Stress & Effects on Health – Acute, Episodic & Chronic Stress.” Neurocore, 13 Apr. 2018, www.neurocorecenters.com/blog/understanding-your-stress-type-how-to-manage-it.

     

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  • Boosting Your Performance in College

    by Chris Simmons

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    College is a critical time in a young person’s life because it is the launching pad that gives them a boost to find a career path. That is why the mindset changes transitioning from high school to college because in college, your goal is to try and use your education to set the foundation for the rest of your career. People tend to be more focused and take more initiative in their studies because they understand the value college can offer. 

    Sometimes college students can get so caught up in the stresses of schoolwork that they feel like they can’t do anything else with their time. Yes, you should take time to focus on doing well in your studies but being buried in your books all day will not help give you the maximum benefit of college. Students should learn how to live a balanced life in college. Getting involved in activities you enjoy can help reduce stress and make college life easier. Here are some personal tips that I have learned throughout my college experience which have helped enhance my performance: 

    Clear Your Mind

    Take at least one hour out of your day to do an activity that helps you de-stress. I enjoy lifting weights in the mornings because it makes my body feel good and helps give me the energy I need to go about the rest of my day. Everybody has different forms of self-medication. Whether it’s yoga, going for a walk, listening to music, or reading a book, whatever gives you the most satisfaction, set aside time every day to engage in that activity. 

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  • Thankfulness and the Power of Positivity

    by Maddie Parker Martinez

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    Thanksgiving is the season to give thanks, but why limit our thanksgiving to just one season out of the entire year? For college students, stress can inhibit our ability to feel thankful about anything in our school careers. But being thankful can lead to positive thinking. Maintaining a positive outlook throughout all our classes, exams, and projects can not only change our attitude, but can also have the power to make us happier and more successful in school.  

    One Step at a Time

    I recently learned an important lesson about being stress free from one of my professors at Utah Valley University, Dr. Leandra Hernandez. She has been my favorite professor throughout my college career thus far, not only because of her teaching abilities, sense of humor, and passion about what she teaches, but most importantly because of her motto of being stress free. 

    The Media Ethics class that she teaches covers some difficult content and it is easy to feel overwhelmed. She constantly reminds us to be stress free and take things one step at a time. I have learned that by following her advice, I am more positive in that class and more thankful for the opportunity that I have to receive an education.

    An Amazing Impact

    I’ve tried to apply this motto to everything in my life instead of just the Media Ethics class, and I was amazed by the impact that it had. Of course, my stress didn’t just vanish. But when I stopped to identify the source of my stress, I could break down what I needed to do into more manageable steps and then take them one at a time. Taking this active approach also helped me recognize things that can’t be changed or were out of  my control. Being proactive in handling my stress made me feel so happy, positive, and grateful. 

    Giving thanks in this season is important, but sometimes can be difficult with all the stress surrounding us. As we try to be stress free and take things one step at a time, it will help us to be more positive and relaxed. It’s easier to be more thankful when you are feeling at peace with your surroundings. I invite everyone who’s reading this post to take a second and think about all the things that are stressors in your life, and turn them into something more positive. Take things one step at a time and be thankful for all you have.

     

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  • Working Out the Stress

    by Jesus Hernandez

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    Being a full-time student and having to manage school, work, social life, and family can be hard. There are many different reasons why college students get stressed out throughout the whole semester, so finding something that helps you cope with it all is key. I have found that working out and working on my health helps me forget about everything going on for a minute and just enjoy that time to make myself better. Here are three ways to make time for your health and keep your stress level under control.

    Set a Schedule

    One way I have been able to manage my time while in college is to set a daily agenda of everything I need to do, including my workout. Keeping a schedule is crucial in planning your day, so everything you have to do gets done on time. Sometimes you might think you aren’t able to get your workout in because you have a test to study for, but exercising actually helps you retain more information. It gives your brain a break and your body an outlet to release some energy. For me, making time for the gym has become a habit and my day is better once I get my workout in. Whether it be at six in the morning or nine at night, I always make it a point to go. While it may be hard to prioritize, finding something that separates you from your day-to-day stress can bring more balance into your life.

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