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Aerodynamics for Engineers, 6th edition

  • John J. Bertin
  • Russell M. Cummings

Published by Pearson (March 25th 2013) - Copyright © 2014

6th edition

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Aerodynamics for Engineers (2-downloads)

ISBN-13: 9780132832953

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Table of contents

PREFACE TO THE SIXTH EDITION xv

CHAPTER 1 WHY STUDY AERODYNAMICS? 1

1.1 Aerodynamics and the Energy-Maneuverability Technique 2

1.1.1 Specific Excess Power 6

1.1.2 Using Specific Excess Power to Change the Energy Height 7

1.1.3 John R. Boyd Meet Harry Hillaker 8

1.1.4 The Importance of Aerodynamics to Aircraft Performance 8

1.2 Solving for the Aerothermodynamic Parameters 8

1.2.1 Concept of a Fluid 8

1.2.2 Fluid as a Continuum 8

1.2.3 Fluid Properties 10

1.2.4 Pressure Variation in a Static Fluid Medium 17

1.2.5 The Standard Atmosphere 22

1.3 Description of an Airplane 26

1.4 Summary 27

Problems 28

References 32

 

CHAPTER 2 FUNDAMENTALS OF FLUID MECHANICS 33

2.1 Introduction to Fluid Dynamics 34

2.2 Conservation of Mass 36

2.3 Conservation of Linear Momentum 40

2.4 Applications to Constant-Property Flows 46

2.4.1 Poiseuille Flow 46

2.4.2 Couette Flow 50

2.4.3 Integral Equation Application 52

2.5 Reynolds Number and Mach Number as Similarity Parameters 55

2.6 Concept of the Boundary Layer 63

2.7 Conservation of Energy 65

2.8 First Law of Thermodynamics 66

2.9 Derivation of the Energy Equation 68

2.9.1 Integral Form of the Energy Equation 71

2.9.2 Energy of the System 71

2.9.3 Flow Work 72

2.9.4 Viscous Work 73

2.9.5 Shaft Work 73

2.9.6 Application of the Integral Form of the Energy Equation 74

2.10 Summary 76

Problems 76

References 87

 

CHAPTER 3 DYNAMICS OF AN INCOMPRESSIBLE, INVISCID FLOW FIELD 88

3.1 Inviscid Flows 89

3.2 Bernoulli’s Equation 90

3.3 Use of Bernoulli’s Equation to Determine Airspeed 93

3.4 The Pressure Coefficient 96

3.5 Circulation 99

3.6 Irrotational Flow 102

3.7 Kelvin’s Theorem 103

3.7.1 Implication of Kelvin’s Theorem 104

3.8 Incompressible, Irrotational Flow and the Velocity Potential 104

3.8.1 Irrotational Condition 105

3.8.2 Boundary Conditions 105

3.9 Stream Function in a Two-Dimensional, Incompressible Flow 107

3.10 Relation between Streamlines and Equipotential Lines 109

3.11 Superposition of Flows 112

3.12 Elementary Flows 113

3.12.1 Uniform Flow 113

3.12.2 Source or Sink 114

3.12.3 Doublet 116

3.12.4 Pote

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