Working in alternative and complementary therapies

Some alternative and complementary therapies are offered alongside medicine and nursing care, including occupational therapy and art therapy.

You may work with patients who have a long-term issue or disability or who are recovering from an illness or surgery. If you choose a career in other therapies, such as reiki, shiatsu, massage and aromatherapy, you are more likely to be based in a therapy centre or spa. Some complementary and alternative therapists are medically qualified, while others are qualified in their therapy but not in medicine. Some therapists offer more than one type of therapy.

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Approximate pay levels

Figures supplied as a guide only

Pay level graph

Future careers

Therapies which help people with stress management are growing, reflecting the hectic lifestyles many people have.

Things to consider

Things you may need to know:

  • To become a therapist, you need to become qualified in your therapy before you can work with clients.
  • Some therapies such as physiotherapy and massage can be physically demanding.

Useful links

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Complementary & Natural Healthcare Council

Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC)

General Regulatory Council for Complementary Therapies (GRCCT)