A is for Asking Questions: Embracing Meaning, Contraries, and Reflective Relationships in Our Classes

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Facts and expertise are often false friends; they promise much more than they can deliver. Yet typical college pedagogy treats answers as treasures to be collected and organized. What is the implication of seeing answers as disguised aggregations of questions? Why do our learners not ask more and better questions? What are the drawbacks to a classroom structured around questions? What do teachers have to lose from such a structure? How would such a perspective be received by our students? How can devoted teachers effectively respond to student resistance to the level of required engagement once questions are treated with the respect they deserve? How is the habit of asking certain questions an essential life skill? What specific questions propel lifetime liberal learning

Facts and expertise are often false friends; they promise much more than they can deliver. Yet typical college pedagogy treats answers as treasures to be collected and organized. What is the implication of seeing answers as disguised aggregations of questions? Why do our learners not ask more and better questions? What are the drawbacks to a classroom structured around questions? What do teachers have to lose from such a structure? How would such a perspective be received by our students? How can devoted teachers effectively respond to student resistance to the level of required engagement once questions are treated with the respect they deserve? How is the habit of asking certain questions an essential life skill? What specific questions propel lifetime liberal learning?

Speakers

M. Neil Browne, Distinguished Teaching Professor of Economics and Law and Senior Scholar, Bowling Green State University