Arguing Generatively and Persuasively

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In this session you will learn about teaching two types of argument: generative argument (power with) and persuasive argument (power over). Traditionally, students have been told that argument is primarily about persuasion and exerting power over others. They learn that argument is a tool for defending their beliefs, confronting others, attacking weak logic, and reinforcing positions. In other words, persuasive argument is the rhetoric of battle or conflict.

In this session you will learn about teaching two types of argument: generative argument (power with) and persuasive argument (power over). Traditionally, students have been told that argument is primarily about persuasion and exerting power over others. They learn that argument is a tool for defending their beliefs, confronting others, attacking weak logic, and reinforcing positions. In other words, persuasive argument is the rhetoric of battle or conflict.

In today's networked culture, though, the importance of generative rhetoric has grown dramatically because students need to learn how to shape the flow of information and exert power with others. Using generative strategies, students need to learn how to frame and re-frame ideas, create identification, use narratives, and negotiate with others. Both generative and persuasive argument are important in today's culture. We will show you how to teach your students to use both types of argument.

Speakers

Charles Paine Richard Johnson-Sheehan

Speakers

Charles Paine, Professor of English, University of New Mexico