Working in the emergency services with a degree (or similar)

Highly trained specialists support the work of the police, fire and ambulance services.

You don’t always need a degree, but you do need a high level of knowledge and experience. Some jobs are with private companies that carry out work on behalf of the police.

Example jobs

Scenes of crime officer
Preserving pieces of evidence from crime scenes for analysis.

Intelligence analyst
Gathering information and analysing it to solve crimes.

Volume crime support officer
Taking statements from witnesses of crime.

Police inspector
Working on the operations side of policing, often out of the station, leading a team of sergeants and officers. Supervising a police shift of sergeants and constables.

Approximate pay levels

Figures supplied as a guide only

Pay levels graph

Typical working conditions

  • Work will be mainly office-based, but depends on the job role.
  • Scenes of crime staff travel and may spend long periods outdoors or in domestic homes.
  • Volume crime support officers may need to travel.
  • Work can be fast-paced, especially during large investigations.

Qualifications needed

Although jobs may not specifically require a degree, entry to some jobs is so competitive that many entrants are graduates. Often you need technical skills and qualifications such as health and safety from other jobs. Some specialists with specific degrees work closely with the emergency services - such as forensic scientists.

Career path

In all these jobs you can progress to supervisor or management roles. You may become a specialist in a particular type of evidence or investigation.

 
 

As a nurse, you can take on more senior roles, including management. You could decide to move into working in a school, company, prison or in the armed forces. Doctors can specialise, become more senior (for example, becoming a consultant) or move into management. They can also work elsewhere, including in private practice.

 
 

As a nurse, you can take on more senior roles, including management. You could decide to move into working in a school, company, prison or in the armed forces. Doctors can specialise, become more senior (for example, becoming a consultant) or move into management. They can also work elsewhere, including in private practice.

Useful links

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Police Recruitment