Working in digital media with A levels (or similar)

Competition for jobs in this industry is fierce. Taking relevant A levels or other Level 3 qualifications such as ICT, English, art, design or creative and media will show employers that you are enthusiastic.

Show employers that you are interested in a digital media career through your hobbies and work experience. If you taught yourself programming code, created your own app, developed a website, edit videos or write a blog, show this evidence to employers.

Case study

Emma Dalzell

We offer internships, mainly to college and university students who are looking for some experience or who want to understand how an agency works...

Emma Dalzell, Bare Bones Media

Example jobs

Computer games tester
Finds and records bugs and makes recommendations on how the game’s usability could be improved.

Production assistant
Supports the production of digital content – for example, by getting graphics ready for a website.

Data entry assistant
Enters and updates information on computer systems and websites.

Digital marketing assistant
Assists senior staff to promote an organisation’s products or services online.

App developer
Creates apps for lots of different uses using computer code.

Web designer
Uses technical and creative skills to build or redesign websites.

Social media coordinator
Integrates an organisation’s social media strategy and raises brand awareness online using networks such as Twitter and Facebook.

Approximate pay levels

Figures supplied as a guide only

Many people working in the industry have degrees or similar. If you want to start with just A levels or similar, be prepared to take an entry-level job and work your way up.

Pay levels graph

Typical working conditions

  • You will be office-based, working standard office hours: 9am to 5pm.
  • You may be expected to work late on occasion to meet project deadlines.

Qualifications needed

  • You will need to complete a Level 3 qualification at school, college or through an apprenticeship. You may prefer a vocational route such as a BTEC Level 3 qualification or apprenticeship.
  • If you prefer a more academic route, then A levels might be for you. If you would like a technical role, you should choose A level subjects such as science, ICT and maths.
  • Alternatively, you could study online courses offered through BCS or other ICT institutes.

Career path

  • A web designer may want to improve their web developing skills to earn a higher salary.
  • A social media coordinator could progress to marketing manager responsible for overseeing the organisation’s marketing strategy.
  • A developer could move on in their career by completing an accredited degree which could open more doors.

Useful links

Pearson is not responsible for content on external websites.

Creative Skillset

Information about careers in areas including games and VFX

Codecademy

Interactive exercises to help you learn how to code

The Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM)

Information about different routes into a career in marketing