Haploid vs. Diploid Cells

by Jason Amores Sumpter
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and this video, we're going to distinguish between Hap Lloyd and deployed cells. But first we need to define the term sell ploy T, and so sell Employee is defined as the number of copies or sets of specific genes or chromosomes found in a cell. And so when it comes to sell Ploy D, for the purposes of this course, there are really two specific terms that you should be familiar with, and we have the number down below number one and number two. And so the very first term that you should know is Hap Lloyd and Half Lloyd is commonly symbolized with the letter, and and so Hap Lloyd cells are going to be cells that only have one copy of each gene or chromosome. Now, the second term that you should know is deployed, and the term deployed is commonly abbreviated. Using the symbol to and and so deployed basically means that the cells going toe have two copies of each gene or chromosome. And of these two copies, one of the copies is going to be inherited from each of the parents. One copy would be inherited from the mother, and the other copy would be inherited from the father. And so one way that helps me remember the difference between Hap Lloyd and deployed is that the root die here and deployed as a route that means to. And so DYP Lloyd or deployed here means that it's going to have two copies of every gene or chromosome. And of course, the root Hap Lloyd has this route hat here, which can remind you of the hat and the word half. And so Hap Lloyd cells are going to have half the number of chromosomes as deployed cells. So they have one copy of each gene or chromosome instead of having two copies of each gene or chromosome. And so, if we take a look at our image down below, we can further distinguish between Hap Lloyd and deployed cells. And so notice over here on the left hand side, we're showing you Ah hap Lloyd Cell and Hap Lloyd is commonly abbreviated with just the letter end. And so which will notice is that the Hap Witsel has one copy of the tall chromosome and one copy of the short chromosome, so it really only has one copy of each chromosome and of course, there are genes on the chromosome, so it's only gonna have one copy of each gene. And so here is a half Floyd cell with again one copy of the tall chromosome in blue and one copy of the short chromosome here in reddish color. Now, if we compare that to the deployed cell over here on the right hand side again deployed is commonly abbreviated with the symbol to n, uh noticed that there are two copies of the tall chromosome. There's one copy here in blue inherited from the father. And there's another copy of the tall chromosome inherited from the mother here. Uh, so there are two copies of the tall chromosome and then notice that there are also two copies of the short chromosome. There's one copy of the short chromosome here in blue, inherited from the father and one copy of the short chromosome. Uh, reddish pink here, inherited from the mother. And so there are two copies of every chromosome on. Of course, there are genes on the chromosome, so there are also two copies of every gene in the deployed cell. And so here you can see a cell on its nucleus with the deployed number of chromosomes here. And so distinguishing between Hap Lloyd and deployed cells is going to be very important as we move forward in our course and talk about my Oh, sis. So this here concludes our brief introduction to Hap Lloyd versus deployed cells, and we'll be able to get some practice applying these concepts as we move forward in our course. So I'll see you all in our next video.