logo

Animation: Investigating the Survivorship Curve of Oysters

by Pearson
5 views
Was this helpful ?
0
Oysters are sedentary shellfish that feed on bacteria and small organisms in bays and estuaries. At times, an oyster population may consist mostly, if not exclusively, of adults. But at other times, the population may consist of adults and huge numbers of young larvae. Most larvae don't survive to adulthood. Let's look at the oyster survivorship curve. Oysters produce millions of eggs, many of which are fertilized and become larvae. However, the young oysters are eaten by a variety of small oceanic animals. Many oyster larvae also die because they fail to find a satisfactory place to settle and feed. This leads to rapid loss of young oysters in this population. There are, however, advantages to this survival strategy. Oysters exhibit an opportunistic life history, producing a great number of offspring. There is no parental care of the young, but oysters that do survive to adulthood have few enemies. Oysters can live for more than 10 years and produce many offspring during their lifetimes. Other organisms such as grasses, orchids, and redwood trees have similar survivorship curves. They produce many seeds, but many fail to find the right conditions to germinate. In addition, birds and other animals eat many of the seeds and seedlings.
Oysters are sedentary shellfish that feed on bacteria and small organisms in bays and estuaries. At times, an oyster population may consist mostly, if not exclusively, of adults. But at other times, the population may consist of adults and huge numbers of young larvae. Most larvae don't survive to adulthood. Let's look at the oyster survivorship curve. Oysters produce millions of eggs, many of which are fertilized and become larvae. However, the young oysters are eaten by a variety of small oceanic animals. Many oyster larvae also die because they fail to find a satisfactory place to settle and feed. This leads to rapid loss of young oysters in this population. There are, however, advantages to this survival strategy. Oysters exhibit an opportunistic life history, producing a great number of offspring. There is no parental care of the young, but oysters that do survive to adulthood have few enemies. Oysters can live for more than 10 years and produce many offspring during their lifetimes. Other organisms such as grasses, orchids, and redwood trees have similar survivorship curves. They produce many seeds, but many fail to find the right conditions to germinate. In addition, birds and other animals eat many of the seeds and seedlings.