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Animation: Nucleic Acid Structure

by Pearson
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Nucleic Acid Stucture This is a closeup view of a DNA polymer, one of two twisted strands that make up a DNA molecule. Cells make nucleic acid polymers by linking together four kinds of monomers called nucleotides. Each nucleotide consists of a sugar (deoxyribose in DNA), a phosphate group, and a nitrogen-containing base-- abbreviated G, A, C, or T. Like letters in a sentence, the sequence of nucleotides in a nucleic acid carries information. The DNA of every organism has a unique nucleotide sequence. This illustration shows only a tiny segment of DNA, which may be millions of nucleotides in length. DNA normally consists of two strands of nucleotides that twist around one another, forming the famous double helix. The strands are held together by hydrogen bonds between pairs of nitrogenous bases. The base A always pairs with T, and C always pairs with G. This is a closeup view of an RNA polymer. RNA looks a lot like DNA, except it is typically single-stranded, contains a different sugar (called ribose), and has the base uracil (U) instead of thymine (T). RNA is copied from part of a DNA molecule, so it is shorter than DNA-- dozens to thousands of nucleotides.
Nucleic Acid Stucture This is a closeup view of a DNA polymer, one of two twisted strands that make up a DNA molecule. Cells make nucleic acid polymers by linking together four kinds of monomers called nucleotides. Each nucleotide consists of a sugar (deoxyribose in DNA), a phosphate group, and a nitrogen-containing base-- abbreviated G, A, C, or T. Like letters in a sentence, the sequence of nucleotides in a nucleic acid carries information. The DNA of every organism has a unique nucleotide sequence. This illustration shows only a tiny segment of DNA, which may be millions of nucleotides in length. DNA normally consists of two strands of nucleotides that twist around one another, forming the famous double helix. The strands are held together by hydrogen bonds between pairs of nitrogenous bases. The base A always pairs with T, and C always pairs with G. This is a closeup view of an RNA polymer. RNA looks a lot like DNA, except it is typically single-stranded, contains a different sugar (called ribose), and has the base uracil (U) instead of thymine (T). RNA is copied from part of a DNA molecule, so it is shorter than DNA-- dozens to thousands of nucleotides.