Monomers & Polymers

by Jason Amores Sumpter
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in this video, we're going to introduce the two terms monomers and polymers, and so monomers with the mono prefix are going to be single individual building blocks that can be repetitive Lee linked together to form polymers. And so the root mono is a route that actually means one or singular, whereas the root polly in polymers is going to mean many. And so polymers are defined as long chains of many monomers that air linked together. Now the monomers, those individual building blocks that are used to build polymers will actually vary depending on the type of bio molecule polymer that they're building. And so it's important to also note that carbohydrates, proteins and nucleic acids they all use consistent monomers to form their polymers. However, lipids are a little bit different because they do not use a consistent monomer to build polymers. And we'll get to talk Maura about these lipids later in our course. But for now, let's focus on the monomers and polymers. So if we take a look at our example image down below, we can focus on the monomers and polymers. And so actually I'm gonna direct you to this image over here on the right hand side, which shows you these individual separate building blocks over here. And because these are single individual building blocks that are separate from one another, we refer to these as monomers. And then, of course, if we were to link all of these monomers together into a long chain of many monomers linked, uh, then we have ourselves a polymer. So this whole thing is a polymer, and these individual pieces that we see over here are the monomers. Now, as we mentioned up above in our text monomers air going to vary depending on the type of bio molecule polymer. And really, it's only the carbohydrates, proteins and nucleic acids that use consistent monomer. So those are the ones that we're gonna focus on over here in this key and lipids, they don't use consistent monomer, so we'll talk about the lipids later. But if we take a look at this key over here on the left hand side, noticed that for carbohydrates, all of these little gray monomer building blocks that we see over here are really going to be mono sacha rides and moving forward in our course, we're gonna represent those building blocks those mono sack rides as these bluish hexagons. Now for proteins. On the other hand, these gray thes building blocks that we see over here these monomers would actually be amino acids and those amino acids moving forward in our course, we're gonna represent them as these circles and then for nuke laich acids. Um, the monomers thes pieces that we see here are really going to be nucleotides which moving forward in our course, we're going to represent what shapes that look like this. And so the rial main point here is that these monitors, they're going to vary what these building blocks are. They'll very depending on the type of bio molecule polymer that they're building, whether they're building carbohydrates, proteins or nucleic acids. And so, once again, we'll get to talk Maura about monomers and polymers moving forward in our course. And this is just the introduction. So I'll see you all in our next video