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Animation: The Human Respiratory System

by Pearson
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The Human Respiratory System Let's review the structure and function of the different parts of the human respiratory system. The nasal cavity is where incoming air is filtered, warmed, and humidified. The pharynx is the place where the paths of food and air cross. The larynx produces voice sounds. The trachea is also called the windpipe. It branches into two bronchi, one leading to each lung. The diaphragm is the sheet of muscle that helps air move in and out of the lungs. Within the lung the bronchi (singular bronchus) branch repeatedly into finer and finer tubes called bronchioles. The bronchioles are fine tubes that carry inhaled air to the alveoli. The alveoli, where gases are actually exchanged, are air sacs clustered at the tips of the tiniest bronchia. The oxygen enters the circulatory system through the capillaries. Branches of the pulmonary arteries convey oxygen-poor blood from body tissues to the alveoli. And branches of the pulmonary veins transport Oxygen-rich blood that is lowest in carbon dioxide, back to the heart.
The Human Respiratory System Let's review the structure and function of the different parts of the human respiratory system. The nasal cavity is where incoming air is filtered, warmed, and humidified. The pharynx is the place where the paths of food and air cross. The larynx produces voice sounds. The trachea is also called the windpipe. It branches into two bronchi, one leading to each lung. The diaphragm is the sheet of muscle that helps air move in and out of the lungs. Within the lung the bronchi (singular bronchus) branch repeatedly into finer and finer tubes called bronchioles. The bronchioles are fine tubes that carry inhaled air to the alveoli. The alveoli, where gases are actually exchanged, are air sacs clustered at the tips of the tiniest bronchia. The oxygen enters the circulatory system through the capillaries. Branches of the pulmonary arteries convey oxygen-poor blood from body tissues to the alveoli. And branches of the pulmonary veins transport Oxygen-rich blood that is lowest in carbon dioxide, back to the heart.