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Animation: Structure of the Human Heart

by Pearson
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>> The vertebrate heart is a muscular pump that provides the force needed to circulate the blood. The human heart has four chambers-- two atria (singular, atrium)and two ventricles. The atria are thin-walled chambers of muscle that receive blood returning from the body. And the ventricles are thick-walled muscular chambers that generate the force to pump blood to the lungs and to the rest of the tissues of the body. The right atrium receives oxygen-depleted blood through two veins called the inferior and superior venae cavae (singular, vena cava). When the atria contract, blood in the right atrium is forced into the right ventricle. The right ventricle receives blood from the right atrium and on contraction sends this deoxygenated blood to the lungs. The left atrium receives oxygenated blood through two veins called the pulmonary veins. The pulmonary veins are the only veins that carry oxygenated blood. When the atria contract, blood in the left atrium is forced into the left ventricle. The left ventricle has the thickest walls of the four chambers. It receives the oxygenated blood from the left atrium and on contraction sends it through the aorta to all the tissues of the body. The blood is prevented from flowing backward into the chambers by a system of flap-like valves.
>> The vertebrate heart is a muscular pump that provides the force needed to circulate the blood. The human heart has four chambers-- two atria (singular, atrium)and two ventricles. The atria are thin-walled chambers of muscle that receive blood returning from the body. And the ventricles are thick-walled muscular chambers that generate the force to pump blood to the lungs and to the rest of the tissues of the body. The right atrium receives oxygen-depleted blood through two veins called the inferior and superior venae cavae (singular, vena cava). When the atria contract, blood in the right atrium is forced into the right ventricle. The right ventricle receives blood from the right atrium and on contraction sends this deoxygenated blood to the lungs. The left atrium receives oxygenated blood through two veins called the pulmonary veins. The pulmonary veins are the only veins that carry oxygenated blood. When the atria contract, blood in the left atrium is forced into the left ventricle. The left ventricle has the thickest walls of the four chambers. It receives the oxygenated blood from the left atrium and on contraction sends it through the aorta to all the tissues of the body. The blood is prevented from flowing backward into the chambers by a system of flap-like valves.