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HHMI BioInteractive: Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Video

by Pearson
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SPEAKER: This video was prepared by my colleagues Dieter Egli and Kevin Eggan. And you see here, on the left is what's called a holding pipette, which gently sucks on the egg. The egg is surrounded by a membrane called the zona. And you watch this pipette on the right first drill a hole into the zona, then go in and suck the nucleus out. And then another nucleus, which has been taken from, say, a somatic cell, a cell of the body, is going to be put in. So if we could start the video, please. You see, now, this drilling pipette is going to drill a little hole into the membrane. You can maybe see a little bit of the hole right here at the next part. This pipette, you'll note, isn't really sharp like a syringe. There, you can see a bit of the hole. And now, the pipette's going to go in and remove the nucleus. And if you look carefully in the pipette, you'll see a line in the nucleus, which are all the chromosomes lined up. So that nucleus is going to be squirted out now, because we don't need it anymore. And there, we have an enucleated egg. Now, the next step is to take a set of eggs like that-- and I'll show you two-- and then transfer into them a nucleus from another kind of cell, a fully differentiated somatic cell. So here, the enucleated egg is set on the side. Then it's held by this holding pipette on the left. There is drilling the little hole in the membrane. Here, we go in. Here comes the nucleus from the right. The pipette goes in. And these pipettes are operated with a piezoelectric device. So you can't see it here, but it's like a little jackhammer going very quickly, like Woody the Woodpecker getting in there to then squirt the nucleus in. Here, we'll see it again-- a little hole, and the zona is prepared, and now, the nucleus is going to be squirted inside. So there's two examples of what's called somatic cell nuclear transfer.
SPEAKER: This video was prepared by my colleagues Dieter Egli and Kevin Eggan. And you see here, on the left is what's called a holding pipette, which gently sucks on the egg. The egg is surrounded by a membrane called the zona. And you watch this pipette on the right first drill a hole into the zona, then go in and suck the nucleus out. And then another nucleus, which has been taken from, say, a somatic cell, a cell of the body, is going to be put in. So if we could start the video, please. You see, now, this drilling pipette is going to drill a little hole into the membrane. You can maybe see a little bit of the hole right here at the next part. This pipette, you'll note, isn't really sharp like a syringe. There, you can see a bit of the hole. And now, the pipette's going to go in and remove the nucleus. And if you look carefully in the pipette, you'll see a line in the nucleus, which are all the chromosomes lined up. So that nucleus is going to be squirted out now, because we don't need it anymore. And there, we have an enucleated egg. Now, the next step is to take a set of eggs like that-- and I'll show you two-- and then transfer into them a nucleus from another kind of cell, a fully differentiated somatic cell. So here, the enucleated egg is set on the side. Then it's held by this holding pipette on the left. There is drilling the little hole in the membrane. Here, we go in. Here comes the nucleus from the right. The pipette goes in. And these pipettes are operated with a piezoelectric device. So you can't see it here, but it's like a little jackhammer going very quickly, like Woody the Woodpecker getting in there to then squirt the nucleus in. Here, we'll see it again-- a little hole, and the zona is prepared, and now, the nucleus is going to be squirted inside. So there's two examples of what's called somatic cell nuclear transfer.