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Male Reproductive structures

Pearson
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Male reproductive structures. In this video, we will identify in the cat the structures of the male reproductive system, trace the pathway of sperm through the male reproductive tract, and illustrate the homologies in reproductive structures in cats and humans. We'll begin with the testis, the primary organ of reproduction in males. The testes develop in the abdomen and descend into the scrotum. As they descend, they drag part of the peritoneum with them. This forms the fascial sac that covers the testis, the tunica vaginalis. The ductus deferens and the vessels and nerves that supply the testis are surrounded by fascia, forming the spermatic cord. These same structures occur in humans: the scrotum, the tunica vaginalis, and the spermatic cord. Opening the tunica vaginalis exposes the testis, epididymis, and the components of the spermatic cord. The testes produce sperm. From the testis, sperm moves into the epididymis to mature. The ductus deferens carries sperm from the epididymis. It is continuous with the tail of the epididymis and travels cranially within the spermatic cord toward the inguinal canal. The vessels and nerves that supply the testis travel through the spermatic cord and attach to the cranial surface of the testis. These structures are illustrated here: testis, epididymis, ductus deferens, and vessels and nerves to the testis. To expose and identify the internal reproductive structures, the pubic symphysis has been cut to open the pelvic cavity. The ductus deferens and testicular vessels pass through the abdominal wall through the inguinal canal. Inside the abdominal cavity you can see the individual components of the spermatic cord: ductus deferens, testicular artery, and testicular vein. Within the abdomen, the ductus deferens loops over the ureter and continues caudally, dorsal to the urinary bladder. The right and left ductus deferens enter the prostate and merge with the prostatic urethra. Sperm travels within the urethra, the prostatic urethra, the membranous urethra, and the spongy urethra in the penis. You can clearly see the circuitous route that sperm travel from production in the testis to ejaculation from the penis, beginning in the testis, and traveling through the epididymis, ductus deferens, inguinal canal, prostate, and then exit via the urethra. This is the same pathway that sperm take in humans: testis, epididymis, ductus deferens, and inguinal canal. In humans, internally, the ductus deferens merges with the duct from the seminal vesicle, and sperm enter the prostate through the ejaculatory duct. Sperm then travel through the prostatic urethra, membranous urethra, and spongy urethra. Two glands shown here that contribute to semen are the seminal vesicle and prostate. Lastly, the penis is composed of three erectile tissues: the right and left corpus cavernosum, and the midline corpus spongiosum that terminates in the glans penis. The urethra travels through the corpus spongiosum. The three erectile tissues are the right and left corpus cavernosum, and the midline corpus spongiosum that terminates in the glans penis. These erectile bodies-corpora cavernosa and corpus spongiosum-compose the penis in humans, as shown here in cross section. The urethra passes through the corpus spongiosum. To review, the following reproductive structures have been identified: the scrotum, tunica vaginalis, spermatic cord, testis, epididymis, ductus deferens, and inguinal canal. The internal reproductive structures identified are the ductus deferens, prostate, and urethra. The parts of the penis are the corpora cavernosa and the corpus spongiosum ending in the glans penis.
Male reproductive structures. In this video, we will identify in the cat the structures of the male reproductive system, trace the pathway of sperm through the male reproductive tract, and illustrate the homologies in reproductive structures in cats and humans. We'll begin with the testis, the primary organ of reproduction in males. The testes develop in the abdomen and descend into the scrotum. As they descend, they drag part of the peritoneum with them. This forms the fascial sac that covers the testis, the tunica vaginalis. The ductus deferens and the vessels and nerves that supply the testis are surrounded by fascia, forming the spermatic cord. These same structures occur in humans: the scrotum, the tunica vaginalis, and the spermatic cord. Opening the tunica vaginalis exposes the testis, epididymis, and the components of the spermatic cord. The testes produce sperm. From the testis, sperm moves into the epididymis to mature. The ductus deferens carries sperm from the epididymis. It is continuous with the tail of the epididymis and travels cranially within the spermatic cord toward the inguinal canal. The vessels and nerves that supply the testis travel through the spermatic cord and attach to the cranial surface of the testis. These structures are illustrated here: testis, epididymis, ductus deferens, and vessels and nerves to the testis. To expose and identify the internal reproductive structures, the pubic symphysis has been cut to open the pelvic cavity. The ductus deferens and testicular vessels pass through the abdominal wall through the inguinal canal. Inside the abdominal cavity you can see the individual components of the spermatic cord: ductus deferens, testicular artery, and testicular vein. Within the abdomen, the ductus deferens loops over the ureter and continues caudally, dorsal to the urinary bladder. The right and left ductus deferens enter the prostate and merge with the prostatic urethra. Sperm travels within the urethra, the prostatic urethra, the membranous urethra, and the spongy urethra in the penis. You can clearly see the circuitous route that sperm travel from production in the testis to ejaculation from the penis, beginning in the testis, and traveling through the epididymis, ductus deferens, inguinal canal, prostate, and then exit via the urethra. This is the same pathway that sperm take in humans: testis, epididymis, ductus deferens, and inguinal canal. In humans, internally, the ductus deferens merges with the duct from the seminal vesicle, and sperm enter the prostate through the ejaculatory duct. Sperm then travel through the prostatic urethra, membranous urethra, and spongy urethra. Two glands shown here that contribute to semen are the seminal vesicle and prostate. Lastly, the penis is composed of three erectile tissues: the right and left corpus cavernosum, and the midline corpus spongiosum that terminates in the glans penis. The urethra travels through the corpus spongiosum. The three erectile tissues are the right and left corpus cavernosum, and the midline corpus spongiosum that terminates in the glans penis. These erectile bodies-corpora cavernosa and corpus spongiosum-compose the penis in humans, as shown here in cross section. The urethra passes through the corpus spongiosum. To review, the following reproductive structures have been identified: the scrotum, tunica vaginalis, spermatic cord, testis, epididymis, ductus deferens, and inguinal canal. The internal reproductive structures identified are the ductus deferens, prostate, and urethra. The parts of the penis are the corpora cavernosa and the corpus spongiosum ending in the glans penis.