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Hip Bone

Pearson
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Major landmarks of the hip bone. The hip bone, also called the coxae bone, or os coxa, articulates posteriorly with the sacrum and laterally with the femur. The two hip bones encircle the pelvic cavity. Regions of the hip bone. There are three regions of the hip bone. The big wedge-shaped region is the ilium. When comparing each side of the hole in the bone, notice that one side is bulkier. This region is the ischium. The other side of the hole is thinner and more fragile. This region is the pubis. Major landmarks of the hip bone. Let's examine the major landmarks of the hip bone. The rough auricular surface is where the sacrum articulates. The superior border of the ilium is the iliac crest. The iliac crest ends at this point called the anterior superior iliac spine, which can sometimes be felt from the superficial surface with the hands on the hips. Moving in the other direction from the auricular surface, we find the greater sciatic notch. The large sciatic nerve passes into the thigh through this area. This is the ischial spine. This thick bumpy area is the ischial tuberosity. The ischial tuberosity is next to this hole called the obturator foramen. The obturator foramen is very close to the acetabulum, which is on the lateral surface. The acetabulum is the socket for the femur. On the anterior surface of the pubis is a projection called the pubic tubercle. Determining the right hip bone from the left hip bone. To determine whether you have a right or a left hip bone, find the auricular surface of the ilium. The auricular surface articulates with the vertebral column, which is medial. Notice that the socket for the leg is lateral. The pubis extends front and center to form the pubic symphysis. So, you can see that this is a left hip bone. Let's finish by reviewing the major landmarks of the hip bone. Hip bones. Ilium. Ischium. Pubis. Auricular surface. Iliac crest. Anterior superior iliac spine. Greater sciatic notch. Ischial spine. Ischial tuberosity. Obturator foramen. Acetabulum. Pubic tubercle.
Major landmarks of the hip bone. The hip bone, also called the coxae bone, or os coxa, articulates posteriorly with the sacrum and laterally with the femur. The two hip bones encircle the pelvic cavity. Regions of the hip bone. There are three regions of the hip bone. The big wedge-shaped region is the ilium. When comparing each side of the hole in the bone, notice that one side is bulkier. This region is the ischium. The other side of the hole is thinner and more fragile. This region is the pubis. Major landmarks of the hip bone. Let's examine the major landmarks of the hip bone. The rough auricular surface is where the sacrum articulates. The superior border of the ilium is the iliac crest. The iliac crest ends at this point called the anterior superior iliac spine, which can sometimes be felt from the superficial surface with the hands on the hips. Moving in the other direction from the auricular surface, we find the greater sciatic notch. The large sciatic nerve passes into the thigh through this area. This is the ischial spine. This thick bumpy area is the ischial tuberosity. The ischial tuberosity is next to this hole called the obturator foramen. The obturator foramen is very close to the acetabulum, which is on the lateral surface. The acetabulum is the socket for the femur. On the anterior surface of the pubis is a projection called the pubic tubercle. Determining the right hip bone from the left hip bone. To determine whether you have a right or a left hip bone, find the auricular surface of the ilium. The auricular surface articulates with the vertebral column, which is medial. Notice that the socket for the leg is lateral. The pubis extends front and center to form the pubic symphysis. So, you can see that this is a left hip bone. Let's finish by reviewing the major landmarks of the hip bone. Hip bones. Ilium. Ischium. Pubis. Auricular surface. Iliac crest. Anterior superior iliac spine. Greater sciatic notch. Ischial spine. Ischial tuberosity. Obturator foramen. Acetabulum. Pubic tubercle.