Electrolytes Concept 4

by Jules Bruno
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So now week basis. We call these patterns for identification, so there are a bit different, so we're gonna have to just memorize them here. We're gonna say week bases include from group to a beryllium hydroxide and magnesium hydroxide. And then also we have ammonium hydroxide or neutral amines. Now, what exactly is it? I mean? Well, amine is ah, compound that contains Onley, nitrogen and hydrogen. For example. Ammonia isn't, I mean, which is an H three and in the mean could be a compound that contains carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen. So an example here would be methyl amine, which is C H three and H two. So these are two examples of a means they can have either just nitrogen and hydrogen or carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen. Now for non electrolytes, these don't break up at all when put into into a solvent. So they consist of molecular slash covalin compounds, so those are interchangeable that never dissolved into ions. So here we have a be solid, and when I throw it into water, it becomes surrounded by the water, so we'd say a B a quiz. Now, non electrolytes include water, sugars and alcohol's so sugars are compounds with the molecular formula of C N. H. Two n. H. 20 n. So glucose is an example of this because it's C six age 12. 06 Sucrose is also a sugar. It doesn't fit this formula exactly as nicely, but it's C 12 age 22 0 11. So what sugars at this point, these are the two most common ones that you would see. Alcohol is on the other hand, are Covalin compounds with CNH connected toa Ohh. So methanol is ch three connected to Ohh. And fennel is C six h five connected to Ohh. So in both, they have carbon and hydrogen and beginning and then they have the O. H following it up. Okay, so then the O. H. Here at the end. So again, water sugars and alcohols constitute non electrolytes. They don't break up at all within our solvent.